Talk:Nemesis (hypothetical star)

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New development[edit]

http://arxiv.org/abs/1512.02652 http://www.forbes.com/sites/briankoberlein/2015/12/10/astronomers-find-new-object-possible-super-earth-in-our-solar-system/ http://nextbigfuture.com/2016/01/atacama-large-millimetersubmillimeter.html

Nothing to do with this; 300 AU is nowhere near where Nemesis is supposed to be. Serendipodous 21:53, 9 January 2016 (UTC)
The distance to the object is unknown and it is not massive enough to be a traditional "13 Jupiter mass" brown dwarf. Assuming their results are not "wrong" my money is still on a Pluto like (E)TNO since that is the easiest and thus most likely planet explanation. This could also just be the detection of a star forming galaxy. Nothing useful about Nemesis has been written since ~2003. The Nemesis hypothesis is pitifully dated. -- Kheider (talk) 23:04, 9 January 2016 (UTC)
The theory has been revived anyway thanks to this evidence...21:24, 30 March 2016 (UTC) — Preceding unsigned comment added by 72.226.125.231 (talk)

The majority of solar-type stars are single.[edit]

Hier they say that half to two thirds of near sun-type stars are binaries: http://astrosun2.astro.cornell.edu/academics/courses/astro201/binstar.htm
.. studies of nearby solar-type stars show that about two thirds of them have stellar companions 194.174.76.21 (talk) 16:22, 14 January 2017 (UTC) Marco Pagliero Berlin

It is always better to use peer-reviewed papers instead of an undated webpage. Slightly more than 50% of solar-type stars are single. But this also depends on how one defines solar-type star and/or stellar companion. Regardless, our Sun does not have a stellar-class companion. -- Kheider (talk) 18:45, 14 January 2017 (UTC)
Regardless, our Sun does not have a stellar-class companion That is exactly what I don't see has been proven 194.174.73.80 (talk) 18:41, 20 January 2017 (UTC)Marco Pagliero
Based on real surveys, there is no reason to think there is any undiscovered object more massive than roughly Saturn orbiting the Sun. To think otherwise is to ignore the facts. Regardless, any such object would stay quite far from the inner Solar System. -- Kheider (talk) 19:15, 20 January 2017 (UTC)

cultural references[edit]

Recently came across the 1962 Japanese film Gorath and it seems to hit most of the hallmarks of the Nemesis theory. Should it be mentioned on the page or is it too obscure or unrelated since it actually came out long before Nemesis was proposed? If anything to me that makes it more important since it could be where people made up the idea from anyway but that would be original research until I found proof the people that came up with Nemesis had seen Gorath. IRMacGuyver (talk) 08:17, 29 March 2017 (UTC)

Gorath has nothing to do with Nemesis. You are confusing it with all the Nibiru BS. -- Kheider (talk) 05:00, 30 March 2017 (UTC)