Talk:New York City

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Former featured articleNew York City is a former featured article. Please see the links under Article milestones below for its original nomination page (for older articles, check the nomination archive) and why it was removed.
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DateProcessResult
December 17, 2004Featured article candidateNot promoted
December 20, 2005Good article nomineeListed
February 17, 2006Peer reviewReviewed
April 4, 2006Featured article candidateNot promoted
July 17, 2006Featured article candidateNot promoted
September 18, 2006Featured article candidateNot promoted
November 28, 2006Featured article candidateNot promoted
January 31, 2007Featured article candidateNot promoted
June 10, 2007Featured article candidatePromoted
May 18, 2010Featured article reviewDemoted
October 30, 2011Peer reviewReviewed
June 26, 2012Peer reviewReviewed
April 25, 2013Good article nomineeListed
July 5, 2013Good article reassessmentDelisted
Current status: Former featured article
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Summary on effects of glaciation[edit]

The article contains the following discussion under "Early history":

"During the Wisconsinan glaciation, 75,000 to 11,000 years ago, the New York City region was situated at the edge of a large ice sheet over 1,000 feet (300 m) in depth. The ice sheet scraped away large amounts of regolith, leaving the bedrock that serves as the geologic foundation for much of New York City today. Later on, movement of the ice sheet contributed to the separation of what are now Long Island and Staten Island."

For an article on a city, I find this overly technical and somewhat unbalanced. The mention of "Later on" suggests a sequence of events that is not accurate. The glaciation would have done at least two things of relevance here, leave bedrock exposed and shape what would be exposed surface after the retreat of the ice. But this would have been done simultaneously. The effects would be manifest after the ice retreated. Note, the use of the word "regolith" is something I inserted some time ago, to replace incorrect use of the word "soil" (which is not the same thing). Either way, though, some fixing is needed. I suggest something like the following (a refinement of something similar to what I'd inserted before being reverted):

"During the Wisconsinan glaciation, 75,000 to 11,000 years ago, the New York City region was situated at the edge of a large ice sheet over 1,000 feet (300 m) in depth. The erosive movement of the ice (and its subsequent retreat) contributed to the separation of what are now Long Island and Staten Island, and it exposed bedrock that today serves as the foundation for much of the city.[86]"

Thank you, Attic Salt (talk) 15:28, 1 January 2019 (UTC)

Most bedrock is not exposed, and although important as the foundation of many early Manhattan skyscrapers, I'm not sure it's as important for "much" of the city. Station1 (talk) 06:59, 2 January 2019 (UTC)
Before the glaciers arrived, the bedrock would have been covered by a thick layer of unconsolidated and partially consolidated rock (regolith). This was "scraped" away by the glaciers, leaving exposed bedrock (which is consolidated) when the glaciers retreated. That there is, now, a thin layer of regolith (deposited by subsequent erosion) and soil has not been mentioned (though it could be). I'm not suggesting a rewrite of the whole paragraph, just fix one problem regarding simultaneity, though if others want to rewrite it, please have a go. It won't be easy to summarise so many issues in a short paragraph. Alternatively, the paragraph might be removed entirely. Attic Salt (talk) 14:07, 2 January 2019 (UTC)
Suggestion to replace second sentence: "The erosive forward movement of the ice (and its subsequent retreat) contributed to the separation of what is now Long Island from Staten Island. That action also left bedrock at a relatively shallow depth, providing a solid foundation for most of Manhattan's skyscrapers." Station1 (talk) 00:10, 3 January 2019 (UTC)
Thank you for this suggestion. I went ahead and inserted the sentence. Attic Salt (talk) 13:39, 18 January 2019 (UTC)

Sentence to possibly move from lead[edit]

I don't think that the sentence The city's fast pace has inspired the term New York minute. (near the end of the first paragraph in the lead) should be in the lead. While I think that it would be good in the body, it seems like a particular example of the implications of New York's quick pace that is too specific to be in the lead, which should be a general overview of the topic that doesn't go into trivial specific details. While I agree that the city's fast pace should be mentioned in the lead, I don't think that the lead is the place for trivial instances of this. Care to differ or discuss with me? The Nth User 02:51, 18 January 2019 (UTC)

I agree. This sort of detail can be removed from the lede. Attic Salt (talk) 13:40, 18 January 2019 (UTC)

 Done although the new sentence (The city has a fast pace.) sounds somewhat awkward. Is this a problem? Care to differ or discuss with me? The Nth User 02:30, 28 January 2019 (UTC)

It's indeed awkward – a very short sentence of some banality with 3 supporting citations. Further, the term "New York minute" is now not mentioned at all in the body of the article. Was that intended? The section "Culture and contemporary life" needs some editing (the 1st paragraph is jarring), and maybe the term could be mentioned there. -- Michael Bednarek (talk) 06:00, 28 January 2019 (UTC)
 Done Agreed that "the city has a fast pace" is indeed awkward. I also agree that if New York minute is in the lede, then the fast pace should be elaborated upon subsequently in the body as well. Castncoot (talk) 05:04, 29 January 2019 (UTC)

Semi-protected edit request on 22 January 2019[edit]

Change footnote 569,

""Downstate Pays More, Upstate Gets More: Does It Matter?". The Nelson A. Rockefeller Institute of Government – The Public Policy Research Arm of the State University of New York. December 2011. Archived from the original on May 1, 2016. Retrieved April 27, 2016."

to

"Downstate Pays More, Upstate Gets More: Does It Matter?". The Nelson A. Rockefeller Institute of Government – The Public Policy Research Arm of the State University of New York. December 2011."

With an updated, live link to the new location of the article: https://rockinst.org/blog/downstate-pays-upstate-gets-matter/

This change simply replaces an outdated link with a new link to the same article on the Institute's new website. 141.254.80.15 (talk) 16:36, 22 January 2019 (UTC)

 Done though I kept the archive link per WP:LINKROT in case it goes dead again. ComplexRational (talk) 19:45, 22 January 2019 (UTC)

History from 1785-1790[edit]

In January 1785, Congress moved to the big apple unofficially.

Then, the state of New York ratified the U.S. Constitution on July 26, 1788. Because of this, Congress voted to keep the capital there until they could settle the matter of a federal district.

For two years, New York City remained the official capital of the U.S.

In 1790, on July 16, President George Washington signed the Residence Act. That Act would establish the new federal district on the banks of the Potomac River.

It would take some time to move there and set up shop, but by 1800, New York City ceded the capital to Washington D.C.

From: http://ilikehistory.com/for-2-years-new-york-city-was-the-capital-of-the-u-s/ — Preceding unsigned comment added by 50.232.248.216 (talk) 23:48, 27 January 2019 (UTC)

Hi yes, part of that is already discussed in the article, but you are right that the article needs to close that circle about the capital moving from the city in 1790. Hopefully someone will get to it but we need to find a better source. Thanks. Alanscottwalker (talk) 00:10, 28 January 2019 (UTC)
I just added half a sentence to cover that. Station1 (talk) 08:20, 28 January 2019 (UTC)

Thank you. Great teamwork! — Preceding unsigned comment added by 50.232.248.216 (talk) 23:28, 28 January 2019 (UTC)

Station1: You could add also to the end of your sentence: ,where congress reconvened on December 6, 1790. The decision to move the national capital to Philadelphia was made during the negotiations of the Residence_Act and Assumption Bill of 1790. This led to the decision to designate Philadelphia as the temporary capital city of the United States federal government for a period of ten years, until the area which would later become the District of Columbia was ready.

The last sentence of the Compromise and Adoption section in the Residence_Act gives the exact date of the congress officially meeting in Philadelphia.

The second to last sentence of the Compromise and Adoption section in the Residence_Act article gives the exact time frame of the capital being in Philadelphia for 10 years.

A lot of people will want to be really clear on how the national capital moved from NYC, then Philadelphia, and finally the District of Columbia.

There is a good reference also in the Residence_Act in the background section:

During the mid-1780s, numerous locations were offered by the states to serve as the nation's capital, but the Continental Congress could never agree on a site due to regional loyalties and tensions. Proposed sites included: Kingston, New York; Nottingham Township in New Jersey; Annapolis; Williamsburg, Virginia; Wilmington, Delaware; Reading, Pennsylvania; Germantown, Pennsylvania; Lancaster, Pennsylvania; New York City; Philadelphia; and Princeton; among others. The Southern states refused to accept a capital in the North, and vice versa. Another suggestion was for there to be two capitals, one in the North and one in the South.

The United States Congress was established in 1789, upon ratification of the United States Constitution, and New York City remained the temporary capital.

The entire paragraph may have to be tweaked a little like this:

In 1785, the assembly of the Congress of the Confederation made New York City the national capital after the war. New York was the last capital of the U.S. under the Articles of Confederation and the first capital under the Constitution of the United States. In 1789, the first President of the United States, George Washington, was inaugurated; the first United States Congress and the Supreme Court of the United States each assembled for the first time, and the United States Bill of Rights was drafted, all at Federal Hall on Wall Street. By 1790, New York had surpassed Philadelphia to become the largest city in the United States, but by the end of that year the national capital was moved to Philadelphia.

Proposed edits: remove "shortly" because 1776-1785 is actually 9 years which is not shortly, that is a decade.

New York was the capital of the U.S. or seat_of_government when the Articles of Confederation were written, and the temporary capital or seat of government when the Constitution of the United States was ratified.

By 1790, New York had surpassed Philadelphia to become the largest city in the United States, but by the end of that year the national capital was moved to Philadelphia, where congress reconvened on December 6, 1790. The decision to move the national capital to Philadelphia was made during the negotiations of the Residence_Act and Assumption Bill of 1790. This led to the decision to designate Philadelphia as the temporary capital city of the United States federal government for a period of ten years, until the area which would later become the District of Columbia was ready.

Station1 and Alanscottwalker: Thanks for checking and getting involved on this article improvement. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 50.232.248.216 (talk) 00:35, 29 January 2019 (UTC)

I added a link to the Residence Act, so people can find that info there. Alanscottwalker (talk) 02:16, 29 January 2019 (UTC)

Thank you for including the Residence Act link. Done!

I have one more point of topic for this Section: New York delegation actually ratified the Constitution after it had been officially ratified already by the number of states needed.

See [1] and notice that: 1788/06/21 Sat - Constitution Ratified 1788/06/25 Wed - Virginia ratifies 1788/07/02 Wed - Congress is informed the Constitution has been ratified 1788/07/26 Sat - New York ratifies

Since NYC was the capital at the time and the New York delegation ratified the US Constitution after it was officially ratified, was that the real reason the capital moved to Philadelphia pursuant to the Residence Act? — Preceding unsigned comment added by 50.232.248.216 (talk) 00:32, 2 February 2019 (UTC)

Big Apple[edit]

"Big Apple" is a popular nickname for New York City, as seen in a separate article about just the nickname. Why, then, is it never once mentioned in this article, except in references (I checked with the "search in page" function in Mozilla Firefox)? JIP | Talk 00:12, 18 February 2019 (UTC)

There are several nicknames for NYC as shown in List of nicknames of New York City which is linked from the infobox. That link ought to be incorporated into the article itself, possibly into the "Further information" note at § Culture and contemporary life. -- Michael Bednarek (talk) 04:10, 18 February 2019 (UTC)

Infobox: interactive map kills iOS app[edit]

The interactive map is very nice in Chrome desktop. However, it's crashing the Wikipedia app on iOS. Steps to repro:

  1. In the article in the app, tap Quick Facts to open the infobox.
  2. Scroll down the "Interactive map" and tap it. The screen flickers white then returns to its previous state.
  3. Tap the map again. The screen goes almost completely white.
  4. Can no longer interact with the Wikipedia app, and it has to be force killed.

This may be considered a bug with the app, or even iOS, or perhaps with the Maplink template. Whichever, it's a problem for this article. The bug is not just here; I discovered it while implementing the code on another article. I've only tested this on three iOS different devices, maybe we could get some eyes on it? --Cornellier (talk) 20:01, 18 February 2019 (UTC)