Talk:Noggin (magazine)

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Unsourced and primary sourced stuff, moved from article to talk page[edit]

History

Noggin debuted on October 5, 1990, with V1N1.[1] It was founded by Tom Hunter with the help and inspiration of his friend, Willie Atwell, publisher of the Iowa City Funnies.

Cartoons

Every piece of fiction carried illustrations. Though the absolute page count varied from 12-24, the last page always contained a full-page cartoon by Scott Warren. The pages of Noggin also carried cartoons by editorial cartoonist Joe Sharpnack.

Politics

Noggin's controversial third issue [2] was devoted to opposition to the Gulf War.[3] This coincided with a heavily political time in Iowa City and a march with an alleged 10,000 participants through the streets of Iowa City in protest of George H. W. Bush's Gulf War.

Controversial Issues

Noggin V1,N3 from January 1991 opposed the Gulf War,[4] thereby generating a controversy in the Daily Iowan and Iowa City Press-Citizen.[citation needed] thumb

Controversial cartoons by Scott Warren

Noggin V1, N4 [5] from March 1991 carried a full-page cartoon called "Ranger Woody"[6] on its back cover. This work by cartoonist Scott Warren proved controversial for its brutal humor[citation needed]. thumb

Noggin V2, N7 from November/December 1991 caused a controversy with its publication of Scott Warren's three page cartoon based on the life and career of serial murderer Ed Gein. A pro-choice group whose pages were published in the same edition expressed outrage at the brutality by Gein as depicted in the cartoons.[citation needed]


Above was unsourced and primary sourced stuff, moved from article to talk page. — Cirt (talk) 07:56, 13 November 2012 (UTC)

  1. ^ issue
  2. ^ [1] V1,N3
  3. ^ [2]
  4. ^ [3]
  5. ^ [4]
  6. ^ [5]"