Talk:Northern Ireland

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Former good article Northern Ireland was one of the Geography and places good articles, but it has been removed from the list. There are suggestions below for improving the article to meet the good article criteria. Once these issues have been addressed, the article can be renominated. Editors may also seek a reassessment of the decision if they believe there was a mistake.
Article milestones
Date Process Result
December 16, 2005 Good article nominee Listed
September 7, 2006 Peer review Reviewed
September 19, 2007 Good article reassessment Delisted
Current status: Delisted good article
This article has been mentioned by a media organization:


External links modified I[edit]

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External links modified II[edit]

Hello fellow Wikipedians,

I have just modified one external link on Northern Ireland. Please take a moment to review my edit. If you have any questions, or need the bot to ignore the links, or the page altogether, please visit this simple FaQ for additional information. I made the following changes:

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Questions and comments[edit]

This is a good article. It is well structured and it's informative. I made some improvements and I have a few comments.

1. "In the late 1960s, conflict between state forces and chiefly Protestant unionists on the one hand, and chiefly Catholic nationalists on the other, erupted into three decades of violence known as the Troubles, which claimed over 3,500 lives and caused over 50,000 casualties."

"The Troubles, which started in the late 1960s, consisted of about thirty years of recurring acts of intense violence during which 3,254 people were killed with over 50,000 casualties."

It's not clear to me what "3,500 lives"/"3,254 people" and "50,000 casualties" mean. Aren't claimed lives, killed people and casualties the same thing? There must be some difference I cannot understand.

2. "Following the victory of 1691 ...."

What victory is it? The sentence is not clear. It should be more direct.

3. "While the majority of disenfranchised electors were Protestant, but Catholics were over-represented since they were poorer and had more adults still living in the family home."

This sentence is hanging and it should be fixed.

4. "In 2007, 36% of the population defined themselves as unionist, 24% as nationalist and 40% defined themselves as neither."

Is this in the context of the people living in the 6 counties?

5. "Although some news bulletins since the 1990s have opted to avoid all contentious terms and use the official name, Northern Ireland, the term "the North" remains commonly used by broadcast media in the Republic."

Is the last word referring to the Republic of Ireland?

6. " triple the amount there were in 2001."

What is that "triple" referring to? It sounds ambiguous.

ICE77 (talk) 23:04, 23 July 2017 (UTC)

Religion section[edit]

I've reverted an edit which changed:

In the 2011 census, 41.5% of the population identified as belonging to Protestant or other non-Roman Catholic Christian denominations. The biggest of these denominations were the Presbyterian Church (19%), the Church of Ireland (14%) and the Methodist Church (3%).

to:

At the 2011 census, 41.5% of the population identified as Protestant, the biggest denominations being the Presbyterian Church (19%), the Church of Ireland (14%) and the Methodist Church (3%).

The 5.8% that identified as "Christian, other" will be mostly of protestant derivation but also includes non-RC denominations that are not of protestant origin. Obvious examples are Eastern Orthodox and Assyrian Churches that split from the Catholic Church long before the Reformation. Catfish Jim and the soapdish 12:05, 17 August 2017 (UTC)

Good point. My latest edit should have dealt with it. Haldraper (talk) 12:33, 17 August 2017 (UTC)