Talk:Nymphaea caerulea

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Scientific inquiry of psychoactive properties[edit]

"The flowers are rumored to contain aporphine, an entheogen that is purported to have divinatory properties, and nuciferine, an antispasmodic, but the Egyptian species have never been scientifically tested for these compounds."

There is a documentary called Sacred Weeds which purports to have examined this weed and determined that it contains psychoactive properties. The documentary determines, with a panel of "experts," that the flower of this plant may have been used for its psychoactive effects in the Ancient Egyptian world. Because of this I don't know if the above quote can be fully justified, especially since it does not contain a reference. Heruka2006 09:33, 3 October 2006 (UTC)


Old literature states the presence of quinolizidine alkaloids, unsubstantiated reports of aporphines are present however. The plants are also not botanically releated except they are both in basal orders. 14.28, 3 August 2007 (UTC)


"Recent studies have shown Nymphaea caerulea to have psychoactive properties, and may have been used as a sacrament in ancient Egypt and certain ancient South American cultures" There is absolutely no excuse for this not to provide a citation of some sort. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 199.243.125.61 (talk) 19:17, 24 October 2008 (UTC)

Soon to be delegalized in Poland[edit]

This substance is on the list of 18(?) Substances soon to be delegalized (criminalized) in Poland:

Argyreia nervosa - Hawaiian Baby Woodrose, Banisteriopsis caapi - Ayhuasca, Calea zacatechichi - Dream Herb, Catha edulis - Khat, Echinopsis pachanoi - San Pedro (cactus), Piper methysticum - Kava Kava, Leonotis leonurus - Wild Dagga, Mimosa tenuiflora - Jurema, Mitragyna speciosa - Kratom, Nymphaea caerulea, Peganum harmala, Psychotria viridis, Rivea corymbosa, Salvia divinorum, Tabernanthe iboga - Iboga, Trichocereus peruvianus, Benzylpiperazine - BZP, JWH-018 - Spice

the bill (author of the bill: Grzegorz Sztolcman?) was accepted by Polish Sejm (for - 404, against - 5, and 2 abstent)[1] [2], Polish Senat [3] and the President of Poland [4].


Ttg53 (talk) 14:15, 25 March 2009 (UTC)

Entheogenic properties[edit]

Ott reports it as not having been confirmed yet as an entheogen source, but needing further pharmacological investigation. confirmed alkaloids found are opiate related as noted here.(mercurywoodrose)66.80.6.163 (talk) 20:09, 9 June 2011 (UTC)

odor[edit]

since both uses in aromatherapy and perfumery were noted in the article, a description of the odor and the odorous chemicals present in the plants oil would be nice. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 173.66.61.78 (talk) 03:00, 8 July 2011 (UTC)

Taxonomy[edit]

Should be merged/retitled? Now regarded as a subspecies of N. nouchali (http://www.theplantlist.org/tpl1.1/record/kew-2384388)--Gedrecsechet (talk) 10:04, 8 November 2014 (UTC)