Talk:Object–verb–subject

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Rarest?[edit]

There seems to be a lot of contradiction as to what the rarest word order is, either OVS or OSV. This article states OVS is the rarest, while the article Word Order says OSV is the rarest. I have found various (professional-seeming) sources that give one or the other. Which is it? Suggest deleting statement this article of OVS rarity until both articles can be knowledgably coordinated. 198.45.18.38 (talk) 23:22, 26 June 2009 (UTC)

Arabic language can have OVS(look to qoran)typology,for example:nawatan qata' al qittu=a nut(-accusative suffix)cutted the cat(-nominative suffix).نواةً قطعَ القطُ[edit]

Arabic language can have OVS(look to qoran)typology,for example:nawatan qata' al qittu=a nut(-accusative suffix)cutted the cat(-nominative suffix).نواةً قطعَ القطُ

Humanbyrace (talk) 11:31, 4 December 2009 (UTC)

As for Japanese language, there are sometimes using OVS in speaking[edit]

For example: Ringo-ha tabe-ta-yo? Watashi-ga. (As for the apple, I ate already.)
or: Yaki-Ringo-wo tsukuri-mashi-ta-yo, Watashi-ga-ne. (*I* made baked apple.)

--115.162.182.70 (talk) 19:56, 9 October 2013 (UTC)

4th category[edit]

What would you call something which is neither of these 3 things but is a related conveyance?

Like for example "the archer shot the deer with an arrow". Archer = Subject, Deer=Object, Verb=Shoot, but what is arrow?

It seems like you could flip these too, like if it was worded "the archer shot an arrow into the deer" then arrow becomes the object and deer becomes the context.

Would this be like an adjective or something? Even though they are nouns? "with an arrow" or "into a deer" seem like nouns being used like adjectives since they reveal details about the verb. Ranze (talk) 17:46, 16 December 2016 (UTC)