Talk:On Sizes and Distances

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Untitled[edit]

As of 12/25/2005, this article contains pretty much everything that (to my knowledge) is known about this topic. My main concern is that it's too detailed. Most of the work now needs to be geared towards cleaning it up and paring it down. I plan to reduce the corresponding section in the main Hipparchus article from the current nine paragraphs to about one, since all of that information is reproduced in more detail in this article. --Dantheox 08:37, 25 December 2005 (UTC)


I think that 99% of people reading this article will want to know the actual number of miles or kilometers that the ancients came up with for their distances to the sun and moon, and how far off they were. Maybe I missed them as my eyes glazed over going through all the formulae, but if they are there, they sure aren't very prominent. Davexvi (talk) 18:43, 4 October 2010 (UTC)

The section on Toomer is tantalizing because it is ALMOST complete, but misses crucial information. For example, the author keeps including the variable "t" in his equations, but never explains what "t" is. He also suddenly states that "D ≈ D` + t" without explaining how he jumped to that conclusion. Finally, the last sentence in the section just ends without completing its thought.Dchernin (talk) 12:35, 12 November 2015 (UTC)

On recent addition reference to article by Giora Hon[edit]

I found myself in need of info on this and noticed the lack of references. I am a bit confused about how to reference it. When I searched using Google Scholar, using Giora Hon I there a concept of experimental error in Greek Asronomy I got a clean link to this site:

https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Giora_Hon/publication/231844424_Is_There_a_Concept_of_Experimental_Error_in_Greek_Astronomy/links/564fa57b08ae4988a7a858bd.pdf

But when I go there directly (e.g. by clicking the link above) I get a strange page that asks me to join. I don't know if this site is blacklisted or not. I assume someone will eventually sort this out.--Guy vandegrift (talk) 01:45, 20 May 2017 (UTC)