Talk:Oxytocin

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Oxytocin is a hormone[edit]

Like for Testosterone, I think the role as a hormone should be explained before explaining the use as a medication. The RedBurn (ϕ) 13:18, 29 September 2016 (UTC)

It is both a hormone and a medication. It is on the World Health Organizations list of essential medicine in fact. Both aspects are important. Doc James (talk · contribs · email) 02:14, 30 September 2016 (UTC)
I'm sure they're both important, but it really feels jarring to get into medical details like administration protocols and side effects before any discussion of the chemical's role in neurobiology and social neurobiology—the topic of many, many books' worth of research [1] [2] [3] [4] [5]. If anyone has plans to improve and reorganize this article, I think this aspect is WP:DUE a much larger emphasis. FourViolas (talk) 00:35, 29 November 2016 (UTC)
There is a discussion to split the article which would solve your concern. Doc James (talk · contribs · email) 00:44, 29 November 2016 (UTC)
Split done. Doc James (talk · contribs · email) 21:59, 9 December 2016 (UTC)
FWIW I wouldn't have split this article but whatever. Cas Liber (talk · contribs) 20:18, 31 July 2017 (UTC)

This looks like an error[edit]

"Oxytocin is normally produced by the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus and released by the posterior pituitary.[5]"

"Produced" and "released" mean about the same thing. It seems more likely that it's produced and released by the pituitary, and some other chemical or signal from the hypothalamus triggers release or production.108.211.84.128 (talk) 18:21, 13 October 2016 (UTC)

"Produced" implies synthesis and "released" implies secretion, and these are very different. Oxytocin is produced (synthesized) by neurons in the hypothalamus, mainly in the supraoptic and paraventricular nuclei. It is released (secreted) from the nerve terminals of these neurons in the posterior pituitary.129.215.83.176 (talk) 10:51, 17 March 2017 (UTC)

The dark side of oxytocin, much more than just a “love hormone”[edit]

"There’s a chemical that can subtly shift your childhood memories of your own mother. In some people, it paints mum in a more saintly light, making them remember her as closer and more caring. In others, the chemical has a darker influence, casting mum as a less caring and more distant parent..." - http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/notrocketscience/2010/11/29/the-dark-side-of-oxytocin-much-more-than-just-a-love-hormone/

For the study, see http://www.pnas.org/content/107/50/21371 Gstree (talk --Gstree (talk) 02:49, 18 November 2016 (UTC)

media hype over a primary source. wikipedia shrugs. we wait for reviews, per WP:MEDRS Jytdog (talk) 02:50, 18 November 2016 (UTC)

The "dark side" of oxytocin is right there in the "ingroup bonding" part of Oxytocin#Physiological_effects. For example oxytocin probably underpins racism. See also http://www.pnas.org/content/108/4/1262 and http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0018506X11002868. Author is Carsten de Dreu. --Penbat (talk) 09:24, 18 November 2016 (UTC)

See also De Dreu, C.K.W., Greer, L.L., Handgraaf. M.J.J., Shalvi, S., Van Kleef, G.A., Baas, M., Ten Velden, F.S., Van Dijk, E., & Feith, S.W.W. (2010). "The neuropeptide oxytocin regulates parochial altruism in intergroup conflict among humans." Science, 328, 1408 - 1411.--Penbat (talk) 10:23, 18 November 2016 (UTC)

infobox[edit]

This article still has the Template:Drugbox. What is the correct infobox? We could use:

Thoughts? Jytdog (talk) 02:22, 10 December 2016 (UTC)

The easiest thing to do is just remove the clinical data from {{Infobox drug}}. The remaining information applies equally to the hormone as the drug and is equivalent to what would be found in {{Infobox chemical}}. We don't need to add {{Infobox protein}} as there is already a {{Infobox gene}} in the Oxytocin#Biology section. {{Infobox neurotransmitter}} is not appropriate since oxytocin is a hormone, not a neurotransmitter. Boghog (talk) 06:44, 10 December 2016 (UTC)
I believe "infobox neurotransmitter" is most appropriate, because it contains entries for all the things that are biologically relevant for a neurotransmitter/hormone -- none of the other possibilities do. Looie496 (talk) 14:05, 10 December 2016 (UTC)

References

  1. ^ Hoyle G (1985). "Neurotransmitters, Neuromodulators, and Neurohormones". In Balthazar J, Gilles R. Neurobiology Current Comparative Approaches. Berlin, Heidelberg: Springer Berlin Heidelberg. pp. 264–279. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-87599-1_17. ISBN 978-3-642-87599-1. 2.1 Natural Neuroactive Substance (NAS): A chemical agent synthesized by a neuron which affects the properties of other neurons and/or muscle cells. 2.2 Neurotransmitter (NT). 2.3 Neuromodulator (NM). 2.4 Neurohormone (NH) 

Side by side comparison[edit]

Below is a comparison of what the neurotransmitter and drug box look like for oxytocin. I am wondering if it might not be better to merge the unique parameters of neurotransmitter (i.e., neuropharmacology) as a new section into drugbox. The later has some advantages (collapsable fields for IUPAC name for example). Another advantage is that many of these neurotransmitters are also used as drugs. Depending on whether the infobox is in the drug or neurotransmitter article, we could suppress the display of the neuropharmacology or clinical section respectively. Boghog (talk) 17:00, 10 December 2016 (UTC)

Since none of the parameters in the neuropharmacology section of the neurotransmitter infobox are specific to neurotransmitters (they could equally apply to non-CNS hormones), I am also wondering if we should generalize neuropharmacology section to simply pharmacology. Boghog (talk) 22:28, 10 December 2016 (UTC)

I have made a mockup of what a merged drug/neurotranmitter box would look like in the third column. Thoughts? Boghog (talk) 08:11, 11 December 2016 (UTC)

{{Infobox neurotransmitter}} {{Infobox drug}} {{Infobox drug/sandbox4}}
Oxytocin
Oxytocin with labels.png
IUPAC name 1-({(4R,7S,10S,13S,16S,19R)-19-amino-7-(2-amino-2-oxoethyl)-10-(3-amino-3-oxopropyl)-16-(4-hydroxybenzyl)-13-[(1S)-1-methylpropyl]-6,9,12,15,18-pentaoxo-1,2-dithia-5,8,11,14,17-pentaazacycloicosan-4-yl}carbonyl)-L-prolyl-L-leucylglycinamide
Sources posterior pituitary
Targets central nervous system
Receptors Primary target: oxytocin receptor[1]
Other targets: V1A, V1B, V2[1]
Agonists carbetocin, demoxytocin, merotocin
Antagonists atosiban, epelsiban, retosiban
Precursor oxytocin-neurophysin 1
Synthesizing enzyme magnolysin
Metabolizing enzyme oxytocinase
Database links
CAS Number 50-56-6 YesY
PubChem CID: 439302
IUPHAR/BPS 2174
DrugBank DB00107 YesY
ChemSpider 388434 YesY
KEGG D00089 YesY
Oxytocin
Oxytocin with labels.png
Identifiers
CAS Number
PubChem CID
IUPHAR/BPS
DrugBank
ChemSpider
UNII
KEGG
ChEBI
ChEMBL
Chemical and physical data
Formula C43H66N12O12S2
Molar mass 1007.19 g/mol
3D model (JSmol)
  (verify)
Oxytocin
Oxytocin with labels.png
Pharmacological data
Source tissues posterior pituitary
Target tissues central nervous system
Receptors Primary target: oxytocin receptor[1]
Other targets: V1A, V1B, V2[1]
Agonists carbetocin, demoxytocin, merotocin
Antagonists atosiban, epelsiban, retosiban
Precursor oxytocin-neurophysin 1
Biosynthesis magnolysin
Metabolism oxytocinase
Identifiers
CAS Number 50-56-6 YesY
PubChem (CID) 439302
IUPHAR/BPS 2174
DrugBank DB00107 YesY
ChemSpider 388434 YesY
UNII 1JQS135EYN YesY
KEGG D00089 YesY
ChEBI CHEBI:7872 YesY
ChEMBL CHEMBL395429 YesY
Chemical and physical data
Formula C43H66N12O12S2
Molar mass 1007.19 g/mol
3D model (Jmol) Interactive image
  (verify)
I like the one on the far right. I am not sure if we should call it "Pharmacological data" as we are not talking about the drug use in this case but the hormone. Doc James (talk · contribs · email) 20:01, 14 December 2016 (UTC)
I agree that definition of pharmacology is usually restricted to drugs, but definition sometimes is extended to include hormones. For example, the following is a book devoted to the pharmacology of hormones:
  • Keenan EJ, Thomas JA (1986). Principles of Endocrine Pharmacology. Boston, MA: Springer US. ISBN 978-1-4684-5036-1. 
I would be open to suggestions for alternatives. Boghog (talk) 20:53, 14 December 2016 (UTC)
That is fine with me too. Don't know where the info in the "agonists" and "antagonists" came from. Some of those are not clinically used drugs and are very unlikely to ever be used that way. Jytdog (talk) 20:05, 14 December 2016 (UTC)
The list came from Oxytocin_receptor#Ligands. These of course can be trimmed to include only clinically used drugs. However to state the obvious, this article is about the hormone, not the drug, hence there is no absolute requirement that the list be restricted entirely to approved drugs. Boghog (talk) 20:53, 14 December 2016 (UTC)
IUPHAR maintains a list of agonists/antagonists at the oxytocin receptor. That page could be used to cite some of the entries in the agonists/antagonists parameters. Seppi333 (Insert ) 23:08, 14 December 2016 (UTC)

My 2¢:

  • I don't think it's a good idea to force the width of the drugboxes to 250px. When most of the drugbox parameters are set (i.e., not empty), using a smaller width setting than the default width causes the overall height of the drugbox to increase, despite the increased image size, due to an increased number of line breaks that can be avoided by using the default width (in some cases, {{nowrap}} templates can fix this too). Also, IMO, drugboxes with a 250px width setting look uglier compared to the default setting.
  • "Pharmacological data" is an apt descriptor for the content contained under that heading. "Pharmacology" is not a field which is confined only to the biochemistry of pharmaceuticals and exogenous compounds. The scope of pharmacology also includes the biochemistry of endogenous biomolecules.

Seppi333 (Insert ) 22:55, 14 December 2016 (UTC)

I believe |width= is to adjust the size of the graphic, not necessarily the entire infobox, unless the width is wider than the default infobox. I also think too wide an infobox is a problem. I have simplified the names of the two of the fields and also increased the default width of the infobox to 300px. Now all the labels are on one line. Perhaps the increase of width could be made conditional and only be applied if biosynthetic or metabolism enzymes are specified. Boghog (talk) 08:12, 15 December 2016 (UTC)
That's how the width parameter is probably intended to function; however, the effect on the width of the infobox from setting the width of the image to 250px vs 300px (default width) is shown in Special:permalink/754983857 and Special:permalink/755221229, respectively. Seppi333 (Insert ) 23:09, 16 December 2016 (UTC)
A couple of things. I did not add |width=250px to the transcluded infobox comparisons above. I copied the infobox from the article and this parameter was already set. The default width of the infobox can be set within the infobox code using the bodystyle parameter (e.g., |bodystyle=width:270px). The wrapping is a function of both the label width and the length of the fields and are dynamically adjusted in the infobox based on the content. This dynamic adjustment can be overridden by setting setting the label style parameter to a fixed percentage of the infobox width (e.g., |labelstyle=width:33%). Boghog (talk) 05:44, 17 December 2016 (UTC)
Infobox references
  1. ^ a b c d "Oxytocin: Biological activity". IUPHAR/BPS guide to pharmacology. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. Retrieved 14 December 2016.