Talk:Palmitoleic acid

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Verify Molecular Formula[edit]

There is a contradiction between Wikipedia and this other page:

http://webbook.nist.gov/cgi/cbook.cgi?ID=C1120258&Units=SI&Mask=3

The NIST Webbook lists Palmitoleic Acid as an additional name for 9-Hexadecenoic acid, methyl ester, (Z), which is the IUPAC name.

The MW is different as is the chemical formula. 207.216.216.119 01:33, 20 June 2007 (UTC)

The article incorrectly listed "Methyl Palmitoleate" as a synonym for palmitoleic acid. I have removed it. The article has the correct molecular formula. The link you provide is to the methyl ester of palmitoleic acid (or methyl palmitoleate), which is a different compound and therefore has a different molecular formula. Thanks for the catching the error. --Ed (Edgar181) 01:56, 20 June 2007 (UTC)

Omega 7?[edit]

I work at a pharmacy and I was curious because we just got in a product claiming to have Omega 7. It listed palmitoleic acid (or something with a similar name). I did a google search for "Omega 7" and it came up with a page that listed palmitoleic acid as well. Yet I see it's in the Omega-9 FA line in the table at the bottom of this page. Perhaps this is an area that could use elaboration or clarification from someone knowledgeable? (And possibly a disambiguation page at Omega 7 or Omega-7, which comes up with some Cuban paramilitary organisation :P) - BalthCat 03:57, 15 September 2007 (UTC)

You're right, it is an omega-7 fatty acid. I have removed it from the navigation box. Maybe I'll write up a short article on omega 7 fatty acids and then create the disambiguation page. --Ed (Edgar181) 11:24, 15 September 2007 (UTC)

Moved from article[edit]

Moved from article - irrelevant. --Rifleman 82 04:44, 22 September 2007 (UTC)

==Old Person Smell==

In the April 2001 issue of THE JOURNAL OF INVESTIGATIVE DERMATOLOGY, Shinichiro Haze et al published an article entitled: "2-Nonenal, Newly Found in Human Body Odor Tends to Increase with Aging". [1]

In this article they reported on their work which involved the analysis of body odor components collected, via headspace gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, from shirts worn for 3 days by subjects between the ages of 26 and 75 . They found that the concentration of many components of body odor were unaffected by age. However, they did find that the concentration of 2-Nonenal tended to increase with the age of the subjects. Furthermore, they determined that that 2-nonenal is generated by the oxidative degradation of omega-7 unsaturated fatty acids, such as palmitoleic acid and vaccenic acid, found on the skin surface.

They analyzed concentrations of various lipids on the skin surface by collecting samples in a gauze pad sewn into the shirts and then extracting the lipids with a hexane solvent. The article reported that concentrations of omega-10 fatty acids such as sapienic acid showed no change with age. However, concentrations of omega-7 fatty acids do increase with age.

2-Nonenal is an unsaturated aldehyde with an unpleasant greasy and grassy odor. Because of these findings, some observers have concluded that Haze's team has identified the cause of the phenomenon commonly known as "old person smell", "old man smell", or "old lady smell".[2]
How is this irrelevent? It refers specifically to palmitoleic acid. It may not be NICE, or a reliable study (I don't know, honestly.) but it is certainly relevent to the article. However, the article is rather small so it does seem to be long winded for inclusion here. It could find a home in another article and be linked more concisely from here. - BalthCat 05:28, 22 September 2007 (UTC)
It is irrelevant because it only has a passing reference to palmitoleic acid (note the "such as...". It's better placed in an article devoted to 2-Nonenal. --Rifleman 82 08:39, 22 September 2007 (UTC)

A seperate article 2-Nonenal was created to address this after a deletion debate regarding an Old Person Smell page. Therefore, the palmitoleic acid page should reference the 2-Nonenal page. I propose the following:

==Old Person Smell==
In the April 2001 issue of THE JOURNAL OF INVESTIGATIVE DERMATOLOGY, Shinichiro Haze et al published an article entitled: "2-Nonenal, Newly Found in Human Body Odor Tends to Increase with Aging". [3]
In this article it was suggested that omega-7 unsaturated fatty acids, such as palmitoleic acid and vaccenic acid, found on the skin surface may be the cause of the phenomenon commonly known as old person smell.

User:Smulthaup 10:40PM, 03-Oct-2007 Central Time

gevuina[edit]

I see someone listed Gevuina avellana nut oil as a source. I removed it, but I am open to persuasion on that point. Let's figure out which sources we should list here. Maybe one can list

  • The natural oil with the highest published concentration
  • The most-widely consumed food which is a notable source of PA
  • The source from which it was first isolated

Of course, we would first have to find these, but what I would really like to suggest is that any new source of PA that gets listed in the article must have some or other reasonable claim to fame. --Slashme (talk) 14:07, 4 August 2008 (UTC)

Beneficial Fatty Acid[edit]

I added a sentence to the first paragraph:

"A beneficial fatty acid, it has been shown to increase insulin sensitivity by suppressing inflammation, as well as inhibit the destruction of insulin secreting pancreatic cells caused by saturated fats.[1] "

With link to reference:

1 ^ Chronic administration of palmitoleic acid reduces insulin resistance and hepatic lipid accumulation in KK-Ay Mice with genetic type 2 diabetes, Lipids in Health and Disease

I also removed the Nestel study... and will be adding research that shows how palmitoleic acid increases HDL cholesterol and insulin sensitivity.

LesTP 06:01, 6 March 2012 (UTC)