Talk:Parasitism

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quantitative ecology[edit]

The quantitative ecology section needs revising. Either parametric statistics should be avoided OR data are transformed to conform to the assumptions of a parametric test. I think more references are needed to justify the points being made and to guide readers to places where they can look up advice on how best to analyse parasitic data.Emble64 (talk) 12:26, 30 September 2011 (UTC)

'Value'[edit]

the section headed value is dubious. It inherently assumes that diversity somehow has an absolute intrinsic 'value'; of course this is entirely a human and subjective imposition of value-statements. The best that can be said is that parasites may have 'effects' at the large population and ecosystem levels, and to note what predictions have been made. However, even this is slightly spurious, since these are entirely hypothetical 'benefits', as far as I am aware the speculations being made in this section have never been substantiated. Use of words like "noble" in the description are also loaded with absolute value-judgements which are incompatible with biological science. I suggest this short section be reworked or removed.

Kind regards,

MS — Preceding unsigned comment added by 152.78.178.108 (talk) 11:35, 20 December 2011 (UTC)

Leeches[edit]

Leeches are not parasites. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 98.222.134.149 (talk) 08:07, 17 March 2012 (UTC)

They are ectoparasites. Emble64 (talk) 14:28, 16 November 2012 (UTC)
Let's compromise (and be accurate). Some leeches are parasites. I've changed that example to "hookworms" to avoid the ambiguity. Danger! High voltage! 17:34, 16 November 2012 (UTC)
@Emble64:@Danger: It seems to me there is a general issue with the defition of parasitism given, that the unsigned comment also seems to highlight (see: below) LookingGlass (talk) 14:05, 16 March 2017 (UTC)

Parasites Being of the Same Species[edit]

Are parasites genuinely unable to be from the same species as their host(s) (which is what this article states)? What about parasitic twins? Heck, what about embryos and early fetuses? Futurist110 (talk) 01:15, 7 July 2013 (UTC)

Most parasites are specialized, infecting species with a certain physiology. I tend to think, however, that the generalisation is undue. If you could please quote the sentence that stated that it would be nice.
As for parasitic twins - irrelevant since this is not actually part of a lifecycle, and the so-called "parasitic twin" is not actually developed.
As for fetuses etc.: Don't stop there - let's talk about children in general! François Robere (talk) 15:16, 8 July 2013 (UTC)
In biological terms (though maybe not in moral/political terms) surely that part of a parasitic twin's life that is parasitic is part of their lifecycle. I think there is a general issue with the defition (see: below) LookingGlass (talk) 13:59, 16 March 2017 (UTC)

Modifying Host Defense Section[edit]

I've edited the section titled "host defense." I've added more material, but still kept the content to a minimal since most of the detailed mechanism of host/parasite interactions are located on other wiki pages. Let me know what you all think.

Mouarick (talk) 21:09, 5 May 2014 (UTC)mouarick

External links modified[edit]

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External links modified[edit]

Hello fellow Wikipedians,

I have just added archive links to one external link on Parasitism. Please take a moment to review my edit. If necessary, add {{cbignore}} after the link to keep me from modifying it. Alternatively, you can add {{nobots|deny=InternetArchiveBot}} to keep me off the page altogether. I made the following changes:

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Define exclusion or is it a lay term?[edit]

Dictionary definitions of parasite refer to species that live on/in their "prey", but I think of animals like mosquitoes as parasites and generally they don't do either. Are mosquitoes and ticks then not parasites? In this article I could find no aspect of the definitions given that exclude inclusion of e.g lions, or humans. Lions are dependent upon and live all their lives in close proximity to a wandering herd of their prey (though not "in" it) and intraspecific social parasitism e.g parasitic nursing, defined here as "where some individuals take milk from unrelated females", would include humans who drink cow's milk or even who are provided with wetnurses - assuming the definition here does not need editing. Perhaps however there is no excluding aspect. As the lede concludes: "In many cases, it is difficult to demonstrate harm to the host .. there may be no apparent specialization on the part of the parasite, or the interaction between the organisms may remain short-lived". Yet this seems to include all animals .. fungi .. even plants unless, for instance, parasitism were dependent upon the host being alive while being used as a food source by another, though with respect to cows and wetnurses, this would still seem to include humans. If the term is unscientific i.e nonspecific or insufficiently specific, then I think that fact should be stated at the outset. LookingGlass (talk) 13:53, 16 March 2017 (UTC)