Talk:Park (Korean surname)

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A sentence I can't understand[edit]

"When the case is based on the surname, it means plain." Help? -- Visviva 17:50, 8 April 2006 (UTC)

I believe what the original author meant was that the character "Bak" literally translates to "plain" or "simple". However, when it's used as a surname and put into people's names, the character essentially loses its meaning. -- Koreantoast 19:06, 26 June 2006 (UTC)
Quote: When written with a Chinese character (Hanja), it uses a character that means "sincere," "simple" and "unadorned." When the case is based on the surname, it means plain. In Korean language it is pronounced as "Bahk" or "Bach," as in German composer.
So the essence is that "Pak" means "sincere" in Chinese? Maikel (talk) 01:12, 25 January 2010 (UTC)
Somone please fix this, as of now this segment is unencyclopedic. Thanks, Maikel (talk) 10:32, 22 February 2010 (UTC)
Still unfixed. :( Maikel (talk) 08:05, 29 March 2010 (UTC)

Origin of the name?[edit]

Hi, I'm not going to change this...I've only been studying 한국어 for a year or so. But if my history is correct, 한글 (Hangeul, the alphabet mentioned) didn't come around until King Sejong (1397-1450) was around, as he invented it. So this part of the entry doesn't make sense:

Since the Korean verb for "to shine" or "to be bright" is spelled B-A-R-G in hangeul characters, his last name became Bak.

I guess I'm not seeing how his name could have come around 1300 years before the characters which produced his name. But as I said, I'm not going to change this because I don't know the history that well. Can someone with more Korean history experience fix this?

감사합니다! Hoborocks (talk) 01:54, 16 October 2008 (UTC)

Did the surname not come from the Chinese? In modern Chinese Putonghua, the plant of this Chinese character is pronounced 'po', whereas when the character is used for a person's surname it is pronounced 'piao'. 81.129.182.221 (talk) 03:29, 22 December 2012 (UTC)

You know people still spoke words before they had been written... The representation of the sounds b-a-k in hangul obviously came later, but it doesn't mean the word didn't exist just because the alphabetical representation came later. You kow this is a written encyclopedia, we have to write it down somehow. Teemeah 편지 (letter) 09:30, 4 March 2016 (UTC)

Mixed up redirects ?[edit]

So the entry for Park(Korean name) redirects to Park (name). but the talk page for Park(name) redirects to Park(Korean name).

Something wrong there !

Also there are people with the family name "Park" who are not Koreans or of Korean descent or connected with Korea in any way.Eregli bob (talk) 17:02, 1 June 2011 (UTC)

Indeed. It's also an unrelated Scottish surname. I have changed the general redirects to point to the disambiguation page. --Florian Blaschke (talk) 22:41, 18 December 2013 (UTC)

Cleanup[edit]

I cleaned it up a bit with sources. The midsection though needs references (Position in society). And I think the notable people should be split into the separate article, similarly to List of people with the Korean family name Kim, there are simply too many Parks to be included here in the main article. Teemeah 편지 (letter) 09:25, 4 March 2016 (UTC)

Pronunciation in Mandarin[edit]

At the end of the first paragraph it says Park is pronounced piáo in Standard Chinese, and in the editing source there is a note which says piáo is the only pronunciation. However, on MoeDict (online Chinese dictionary by the Department of Education of Taiwan), it says piáo; also pr. . Shouldn't we add also in Taiwan? Obonggi (talk) 23:53, 9 December 2016 (UTC)

I have already edit the article about the pronunciation. If you have any doubt, please discuss here first. The original editing source there were:

...In [[Standard Chinese]] it is read as piáo <!-- piáo is the only pronunciation for the Korean surname in Chinese--> . In Korean, it is read as 'pak'.

--Obonggi (talk) 07:37, 23 December 2016 (UTC)

intruding r[edit]

It should be made clear right at the beginning that the English transcription Park for the name that reads in reality Pak or Bak is a convention to avoid mispronunciation as of Pack or Back. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 2003:E9:7BC1:3C00:5016:D01D:E8ED:2B68 (talk) 17:51, 22 March 2017 (UTC)

You should add a proper reference to back that claim up! Teemeah 편지 (letter) 07:53, 23 March 2017 (UTC)

I cannot provide a citation. - But it is obvious in just looking at the Hangul and the exact Romanisations that there is absolutely no r in that name, e.g. pf Park Geun-hye.

Hangul 박근혜 Hanja 朴槿惠 Revised Romanization Bak Geun(-)hye McCune–Reischauer Pak Kŭnhye

This wrong transscription has become customary. - But it would be good to abandon it.