Talk:Plasticity (physics)

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untitled[edit]

This page is very bad. The description of plasticity here is simplistic if not wrong. The fact that stress and strain are **tensors** is overlooked. I think it should in particular start with the plastic yield stress, so as to give some insights on how it works). I have added a couple of info myself, but the litterature on plasticity is enormous. Kachanov's book is a good start. Herve661

Clays[edit]

Hi, The article seems good ... up to a point as to me it seems a little biased towards metal. Can anyone expand it to include that most famous group of plastic materials: clays

Regards,

Andy

Be bold! It sounds like you know something about clays so why not contribute yourself. --cfp 19:40, 11 August 2006 (UTC)
In this case, boldness might not be rewarded...in the technical terms in which this article was written, clays are brittle materials that display no plasticity at room temperature. Just try making a permanent bend in an individual clay particle, or in a sintered piece of pottery! You'll need a very high-temperature forge, much hotter than would be needed to work titanium. A suspension of clay in water will deform permanently, but plasticity is a property of solids, not liquids.--Joel 06:00, 11 August 2007 (UTC)

Plastic deformation is a property of the material, not a property of the applied stress. Normal stresses can cause plastic behavior. The most common measure of static material properties is a tensile test.

Effective stress[edit]

The current link out to effective stress doesn't seem appropriate given the current contents of the linked article. —DIV (128.250.80.15 (talk) 07:52, 9 January 2009 (UTC))

Contradicts other Wikipedia article[edit]

Clay - "Clay is a naturally occurring material composed primarily of fine-grained minerals, which show plasticity through a variable range of water content, and which can be hardened when dried and/or fired." —Preceding unsigned comment added by 69.116.236.218 (talk) 01:51, 24 March 2010 (UTC)

I've removed the contradictory examples from the intro in this article. Thanks for the heads up. Wizard191 (talk) 17:07, 30 March 2010 (UTC)

Merge from Creep (deformation)[edit]

These 2 articles appear to be both on the exact same topic and we don't need 2 articles that are so much the same. Blackbombchu (talk) 20:05, 9 March 2015 (UTC)

Creep is continued deformation at a constant load at a high temperature. Plasticity is the permanent deformation of a material at ever-increasing loads. They're two different physical phenomena and should not be merged. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 66.57.103.140 (talk) 14:45, 19 March 2015 (UTC)


Plasticity is the fundamental property and creep is a special case that varies with temperature. They are miles apart and deserve separate pages. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 213.131.175.194 (talk) 14:06, 6 May 2015 (UTC)