Talk:Pluto

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Quasi-satellite disproven[edit]

I updated the "Quasi-satellite" section to indicate that the quasi-satellite hypothesis has now been disproven by New Horizons. Since the whole thing turns out to have been wrong, perhaps it should be removed altogether now. StormWillLaugh (talk) 11:15, 5 June 2016 (UTC)

@StormWillLaugh: According to the (15810) 1994 JR1 article, it is once again considered a quasi-satellite. I have no idea which assessment is correct, however. Kaldari (talk) 02:47, 29 August 2016 (UTC)

Edit request: come into question[edit]

Currently the lead says: "After 1992, its status as a planet fell into question". Please correct this as follows: "After 1992, its status as a planet came into question". Alternatively, "was called into question". — Preceding unsigned comment added by 86.154.102.78 (talk) 20:51, 6 May 2016 (UTC)

yellow tickY Half done. That sentence could indeed be improved, but there are other ways to improve it further. For one, there is the verb "to question". Also, it issn't a status issue per se, but a scientific question about what the nature of Pluto within the Solar System (i.e. planethood). --JorisvS (talk) 09:08, 7 May 2016 (UTC)

Semi-protected edit request on 5 June 2016[edit]

Semi-Major axis of Puto is actually 39.481 AU. 65.113.89.157 (talk) 16:54, 5 June 2016 (UTC)

Red information icon with gradient background.svg Not done: as you have not cited reliable sources to back up your request, without which no information should be added to, or changed in, any article. - Arjayay (talk) 16:57, 5 June 2016 (UTC)

Per Nasa many of the orbital values are in need of updating http://nssdc.gsfc.nasa.gov/planetary/factsheet/plutofact.html (NASA Official: Ed Grayzeck, edwin.j.grayzeck@nasa.gov Last Updated: 04 April 2016, DRW) retrieved 06202016

Semi-Major axis should be 5906.38 Gm and 39.48 AU (Calculated) Sidereal orbit period (days) 90,560 Perihelion (106 km) 4436.82 Gm Aphelion (106 km) 7375.93 Gm Orbit inclination (deg) 17.16 Orbit eccentricity 0.2488 Obliquity to orbit (deg) 122.53 [Axial tilt] 2001:4870:800E:101:4D1A:92C8:5181:D1A1 (talk) 18:48, 20 June 2016 (UTC)

Yes check.svg Done per source provided. Thank you, and my apologies for not realizing you had provided a source here sooner. A2soup (talk) 04:23, 29 August 2016 (UTC)

Clouds![edit]

http://www.universetoday.com/131492/latest-results-new-horizons-clouds-pluto-landslides-charon/ Serendipodous 18:29, 22 October 2016 (UTC)

Universe Today as Source[edit]

I changed some numbers based on NASA fact sheets and they were reverted to the numbers provided by universe today. While I respect this site, I think that it should not be a source for numbers. Opinions? - Duff06 (talk) 21:54, 30 November 2016 (UTC)

Are you talking about your edit from 6 August 2015, more than a year ago? Looking at the revision history of this article around that time there appears to have been a bit of back and forth about the Pluto Fact Sheet being out of date. With the hindsight of history, using Internet Archive, we can see the editor who reverted your edit appears to have been correct about the values being inconsistent. While the values you were entering appear on the July 29 2015 version of the Fact Sheet, a month later the August 28 2015 version had been corrected to the values that match what this article was already using before your attempted change on 6 August 2015. But this entire discussion is moot, as this article is no longer citing the source you find objectionable. —RP88 (talk) 22:44, 30 November 2016 (UTC)

Semi-protected edit request on 2 December 2016[edit]

Please change "because its mass is only 0.07 times that of the mass of the other objects in its orbit" to "because its mass is only 1.07 times that of the mass of the other objects in its orbit" as the former infers that Pluto is smaller than the objects around it, which it is clearly not. Wcliffordbrown (talk) 17:34, 2 December 2016 (UTC)

Not done for now: Please provide a source for this claim. -- Dane2007 talk 19:30, 2 December 2016 (UTC)
Pluto is the largest member of the Kuiper belt. Most of the known Kuiper belt objects cross the orbit of Pluto and can potentially collide with it, these are the objects being taken into consideration when determining if Pluto has cleared it's neighborhood. Pluto's mass is about 7% of the Kuiper belt’s mass. —RP88 (talk) 21:37, 2 December 2016 (UTC)