Talk:Polonium

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Good article Polonium has been listed as one of the Natural sciences good articles under the good article criteria. If you can improve it further, please do so. If it no longer meets these criteria, you can reassess it.
April 28, 2013 Good article nominee Listed
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Note (2005)[edit]

Article changed over to new Wikipedia:WikiProject Elements format by maveric149. Elementbox converted 12:28, 10 July 2005 by Femto (previous revision was that of 06:33, 9 July 2005).

Information Sources[edit]

Some of the text in this entry was rewritten from Los Alamos National Laboratory - Polonium. Additional text was taken directly from the Elements database 20001107 (via dict.org), Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) (via dict.org) and WordNet (r) 1.7 (via dict.org). Data for the table was obtained from the sources listed on the main page and Wikipedia:WikiProject Elements but was reformatted and converted into SI units.


Ok, and what about protactinium it eletroafinity is most higher than any lanthanide or actinide, and it decays to actinium both with half-life of around 30.000 years, they are very very dangerous, and who says it's a poison?, none, because it's scarce!

old. -DePiep (talk) 14:29, 24 February 2017 (UTC)

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External links modified[edit]

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How to make this article not suck[edit]

Polonium and technetium are the only two radioactive elements on the periodic table that Greenwood and Earnshaw tries to treat as normal, upright, stable citizens: they cover Po with Se and Te, and Tc with Mn and Re. (Admittedly they also try for Pm and At–Ac, but without much success: there just isn't enough known to say anything.) Technetium is already an FA, so I will instead write here about how to make my beloved polonium a wonderful article!

  • History
    • We should really talk more about the Curies. Yes, I know everyone knows the story, but that's not an excuse to avoid illustrating it beautifully.
    • It is worth mentioning that polonium was the first element that was first identified and found solely by its radioactivity (though it was isolated by Marckwald, who assumed correctly that it would behave like tellurium). (Radium came later and was partially identified by its chemical similarity with barium.)
    • BTW, the Curie's statement that polonium shows similarities with bismuth must be explained. I suspect this is more a reflection on metallic character. Like Tl, Pb, and Bi, Po is a metallic conductor with a medium-high density and low melting and boiling points.
  • Detection
    • This is more about how to find α- and γ-emitters in general than about 210Po. I would move this somewhere else and just note that polonium, like other α- and γ-emitters, can be detected in these ways in another section.
  • Occurrence and production
    • The focus of production should be 210Po, because, for better or worse, this is the polonium isotope that has told us the most about the personality of the element. This is because it is easy to produce by the reaction 209Bi(n,γ). (You have to use very high-purity bismuth, because 210Po has a short half-life and we don't want to waste time tediously separating it out from all manner of side products, many of which are metals that can form polonides.) And we should mention that (and explain why) this makes it difficult to investigate Po(VI) compounds...
  • Application
    • Tobacco smoke is not an application of polonium. It is a danger.

More later.

P.S. You can legally buy 0.1 μCi 210Po sources! They are exempt from the regulations! Double sharp (talk) 05:57, 16 July 2016 (UTC)

P.P.S. The end of this article is kind of a "laundry list" that is uncertain of what its point is trying to be. What is the main thrust of the last section, which is currently just a list of things that happen to have polonium in them, deliberately or otherwise? (And should not the deliberate cases count as applications?) Double sharp (talk) 05:58, 16 July 2016 (UTC)

Te is the first in the group to show cationic properties that are firmly dominant by Po (and this is why it should really be considered a metal). A metal and a chalcogen! Perhaps we should also explain why this happens, why Po wants to lose electrons more readily than it wants to gain electrons when it only needs two more. (Yes, this is all basic stuff, but not everyone is going to read all the related articles.) In general, we should compare all the trends down the chalcogens from sulfur downwards. Sulfur catenates readily, selenium and tellurium do it more reluctantly, and polonium doesn't do it at all. (No polypolonides are known, though I have to wonder if this is something real about polonium's personality, or because no one's actually tried to make any.) Its hydride is really not very thermally stable (although it's cool to note that like water, it's a liquid, because the van der Waals forces are now strong enough.)

More details on structures of Po compounds please! (Together with references to the similar chalcogen compounds when possible, e.g. SeBr2−
6
and TeBr
6
compared with PoI2−
6
, all octahedral.)

It is also really funny that PoCl2 and PoBr2 are the most well-known chalcogen dihalides.

Greenwood as well as Bagnall call PoSO3 a sulfoxide rather than a sulfide. This is again something that needs explanation. Double sharp (talk) 06:07, 16 July 2016 (UTC)

Organopolonium compounds are a thing, although they are quite prone to charring and decomposition via radiolysis. Source. Po is metabolised in much the same way as Se and Te by bacteria, producing Me2Po. Looking at its vertical neighbours, it would be tough to decide if the stink would kill you first, or the radiation. Double sharp (talk) 06:13, 16 July 2016 (UTC)