Talk:Prague astronomical clock

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age?[edit]

I don't believe this to be the 'oldest working astronomical clock in the world. We have several in England that are older, a prime example being the one in Wimborne Minster where I grew up for which we have a repair bill from 1409

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wimborne_Minster_(church)#The_clock — Preceding unsigned comment added by 65.51.190.48 (talk) 21:43, 28 January 2014 (UTC)

@ 9 Oct 2015, says "the third-oldest astronomical clock in the world" but still no citation. 129.67.47.102 (talk) 08:43, 9 October 2015 (UTC)

greed?[edit]

the greed statue is actually 'the jew with his money bags' because of stereotypical jews as rich and wealthy. should this not be mentioned? —Preceding unsigned comment added by 172.216.180.15 (talk) 17:47, 21 February 2008 (UTC)

Probably not, for any number of reasons. Moonraker12 (talk) 14:58, 27 February 2008 (UTC)
It probably should be, in reference to the historical period in which the animated figures were added. If so, it should be noted that the figure is interpreted today as an allegorical symbol of usury or greed. Likewise the Turk is sometimes re-interpreted today as representing sloth or luxury. I do not have any sources to cite on this, however, and will wait to add this until I can refer to a credible source.72.213.144.148 (talk) 23:14, 5 April 2008 (UTC)
I can find no citations which claim that the figure was meant to be a jew, and even if it was it should be noted in historical context and cited. Someone had changed it to "stereotypical jew" (which is quite a bit more offensive). I have changed to "miser" (as the official page for the clock refers to the figure) - I forgot to login before doing so, but the last change is by me. Getdave (talk) 20:13, 25 March 2012 (UTC)

"Finally, the Turk tells pleasure and entertainment." Should that not be "sells"? — Preceding unsigned comment added by 199.46.200.232 (talk) 00:56, 25 February 2012 (UTC)

Re. naming the statues as the 'Turk' and the 'Jew', why name the 'Turk' as 'Turk'? Shouldn't it be called an 'Infidel'? (i.e. a non-Christian, but typically one of Muslim faith)? Weren't the statues intended to be deliberately offensive against these two non-Christian faiths? The 'greedy Jewish miser' and 'the pleasure-seeking Infidel' (that is, a Muslim, in the late C15th) are both deeply offensive stereotypes, but of primarily religious stereotypes (and only secondarily as racial or national stereotypes). NB I'm certainly not defending these prejudices, only seeking historical clarification in the article. Note also that I haven't changed anything on the page itself. ---- Rosemary1970

File:Czech-2013-Prague-Astronomical clock face.jpg to appear as POTD[edit]

Hello! This is a note to let the editors of this article know that File:Czech-2013-Prague-Astronomical clock face.jpg will be appearing as picture of the day on August 2, 2015. You can view and edit the POTD blurb at Template:POTD/2015-08-02. If this article needs any attention or maintenance, it would be preferable if that could be done before its appearance on the Main Page. Thanks! — Chris Woodrich (talk) 00:07, 14 July 2015 (UTC)

Prague astronomical clock
The face of the Prague astronomical clock in the Old Town Square of Prague, the capital of the Czech Republic. The dial takes the form of a mechanical astrolabe, a device used in medieval astronomy, and represents the standing Earth and sky; surrounding it are four moving components: the zodiacal ring, an outer rotating ring, an icon representing the Sun, and an icon representing the Moon. The clock was installed in 1410 by clockmakers Mikuláš of Kadaň and Jan Šindel.Photograph: Andrew Shiva