Talk:Project MUSE

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Category created[edit]

I've set up Category:Wikipedians who have access to Project Muse for editors who have access to this service. Please add the category to your user page if this describes you. (A similar cat exists for JSTOR.) -- ℜob C. alias ⒶⓁⒶⓇⓄⒷ 19:52, 27 August 2008 (UTC)

Comparison with JSTOR[edit]

Putting some comments here to avoid reverts in article.

  1. There are numerous databases of journals. Why is JSTOR picked for comparison?
  2. "JSTOR usually blocks access to the most recent issues, Project Muse has no blackouts." Does JSTOR actually have recent issues (albeit "blocked") and, if so, is there a citation for that?
  3. Numerous journal aggregators have embargoed content. JSTOR is an archive and does not have content available for a longer period after publication than in most aggregators. It may not be intentional, but this article sounds like it is having a sly dig at JSTOR. But the delay for the moving wall is decided by the publishers not JSTOR, isn't it? The facts are: Muse has current issues; JSTOR doesn't. The first fact is stated in the first sentence; the second fact is stated in the JSTOR article and isn't particularly relevant here. Nurg (talk) 07:22, 14 November 2008 (UTC)
JSTOR and MUSE are the #1 and #2 databases in the social sciences and humanities that feature full runs, often back to volume 1. JSTOR has an announced policy that will block access to the last X years of a journal (X=0 to 10 dependening on the journal; in 80% it is 3-5 years; in 1% it is zero years, same as MUSE). The moving wall was part of its founding philosophy, and does not exist for MUSE. See Moving Wall policy (This is quite separate from the delay in getting the current issue online.) As for the technique used, JSTOR has scanned older issues but now nearly all journals are prepared online and the editors send JSTOR the files. JSTOR releases them according to its schedule. This difference in philosophy is a major feature and deserves mention--that is MUSE appeals more to the users and JSTOR to the journal editors. There is no "sly dig" here; we are comparing official policies.Rjensen (talk) 07:48, 14 November 2008 (UTC)