Talk:Public-key cryptography

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edit·history·watch·refresh Stock post message.svg To-do list for Public-key cryptography:

Merge sections "How it Works" and "Description"

Security Section Needs Citations[edit]

The entire section has no inline citations, especially this sentence:

To achieve both authentication and confidentiality, the sender should include the recipient's name in the message, sign it using his private key, and then encrypt both the message and the signature using the recipient's public key.

It is not clear what adding the recipient's name achieves.

Furthermore under RSA, this "sign-then-encrypt" pattern does not seem possible given the length limitations imposed on the data that can be encrypted (e.g. with 2048-bit RSA the signature alone would be 2048-bits, already exceeding the allowed space for a payload which is always less than the 2048 bits because padding must be included). Am I missing something here? — Preceding unsigned comment added by 197.215.243.110 (talk) 04:20, 17 October 2017 (UTC)

Non-standard use of the word "combined" confusing[edit]

First line 5th paragraph -

"In a public key signature system, a person can combine a message with a private key to create a short digital ..."

and subsequent usages. I have spent in the last 3 days about 10 hours trying to learn the concepts, nomenclature and digital entities underlying daily use of paired-key encryption. Nowhere have I found the word "combined" applied to any PKI method. Thus I don't have a clue what the above sentence means - the meaning of the word "combined" in this use case is unknown to me.

I am sorry, but I cannot offer any specific rephrasing or improvements to this article because I have not yet properly understood the subject myself. My credentials regarding this article are limited to having a college degree and 30 years experience setting up dozens end user computer systems. I have written half dozen user manuals for corporate computer systems and one for a course on Quicken taught nationwide at senior centers. I believe I _am_ qualified to say that this article is confusing, potentially very much so.

As a general recommendation: Utilize standard English in a manner such that one and only one word is used to reference a particular entity, method or concept AND that word is used with the same meaning as most accepted current texts. When attempting to teach a complex subject it is extremely counterproductive to use (even slightly) different words or phrases to reference the same thing within the curriculum. Aligning the local nomenclature with public common usage on a topic is also important and necessary.

In other words: Consistency, consistency, consistency. The topic itself is so challenging that it's imperative to remove as many other impediments to learning as we can. In this case, the richness of language which allows many different ways of expressing the same thing embodies a severe handicap to learning. Less (a limited vocabulary)is more (understandable), in the case of written learning material. — Preceding unsigned comment added by Rlaggren (talkcontribs) 17:39, 13 January 2018 (UTC)

External links modified (January 2018)[edit]

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Cheers.—InternetArchiveBot (Report bug) 11:15, 20 January 2018 (UTC)

Trim and tidy[edit]

Have just done a tidy-up of the intro. The rest of the article is in dire need of the same. - Snori (talk) 19:14, 26 December 2018 (UTC)

Have now done a fairly brutal edit of the body. I would suggest that the most important element to any further changes are: Keeping/building a good structure of sections; Tight wording; Good citations to back the text. - Snori (talk) 20:35, 26 December 2018 (UTC)

References[edit]