Talk:Public Safety Canada

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Links that don't belong?[edit]

Why are FEMA and the Dutch 'Ministry of the Interior and Kingdom Relations' included in the list of Canadian provincial Emergency Preparedness Agencies? The US and the Netherlands are defenitly not Canadian provinces. Baribeau 00:04, 6 November 2006 (UTC)


Spinboy's discussion[edit]

According to their website, there is no 'Department' in the title. Spinboy 22:05, 2 Jan 2005 (UTC)

It is in fact a true department. If this is the case, as with all ministries of the Crown, it would be in the form of "Department of ...", also referred to as "... Canada" - some confuse the department with the portfolio, and vice versa. Taken from the "About Us" page [1]:

The Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness Portfolio is responsible for protecting Canadians and helping to maintain a peaceful and safe society.



The Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness is the Honourable Anne McLellan.

The Portfolio consists of the Department, and six agencies:

Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP)
Canadian Security Intelligence Service (CSIS)
Correctional Service of Canada (CSC)
National Parole Board (NPB)
Canada Firearms Centre
Canada Border Services Agency
There are also three independent review bodies that ensure accountability and respect for the rule of law, and two statutory review bodies of CSIS.

The Department's role within the Portfolio is to support the Minister in giving effective direction to the agencies responsible for policing and law enforcement, national security, corrections and conditional release.

Collaboration is essential in our work. As such, the Portfolio works in close collaboration with Justice Canada, which has primary responsibility for federal criminal justice policy. The Portfolio also works closely with other federal departments, provincial and territorial governments, as well as the voluntary and private sectors.

Cheers,Plasma east 00:02, 7 Jan 2005 (UTC)
That may be, but right on the front page, it says "Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness Canada" with no mention in the offical title of the word "Department". So weather it is one or not, the word doesn't belong in the title of the article because that's not how it's addressed. Spinboy 01:59, 7 Jan 2005 (UTC)
It's very common for most federal departments to present themselves to the public using the more modern, shortened name with "Canada" on the end, as per the "Federal Identity Program". Is it the legal name for these departments? I guess the question should be: How should we name the articles for federal departments? To me it makes sense to make sure the reader knows the article deals with the "Department of...", thus I would advocate using the legal name, not the ad-hoc one which sometimes changes, depending on government stationary, bureaucratic bungling, what-have-you. If the department's name is enacted in law (or soon to be enacted), then that would logically be the one to go with, plus it makes for good consistency on the part of Wikipedia. Cheers,Plasma east 23:04, 7 Jan 2005 (UTC)

Page rename/move discussion[edit]

(from Wikipedia:Requested moves)

Department of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness (Canada)Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness Canada[edit]

The official website lists it as "Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness Canada" -- Spinboy 02:39, 6 Jan 2005 (UTC)

  • Support - The official website lists it as "Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness Canada" Spinboy 02:39, 6 Jan 2005 (UTC)
  • Legal name vs FIP name. The Federal Identity Program of the Treasury Board of Canada controls the non-legal names of federal departments and agencies - to quote from their website, "FIP policy requires institutions to adopt an approved title for use in their signature. Referred to as "applied titles", these names have a dual purpose: to express the function or nature of the institution to the public and to identify it as an institution of the Government of Canada. The requirement for applied titles stems from the development of FIP policy in the mid-seventies when existing legal titles were often long and sometimes convoluted. There was no intent, however, to perpetuate the need for both legal and applied titles when naming new federal institutions. This means that legislation establishing the institution should refer to a title that meets the criteria of FIP policy. Similarly, certain departments have made reference to their applied title while amending their Act, thus eliminating the need to distinguish between legal and applied titles." http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/fip-pcim/man_1_0_e.asp This means that many government bodies have a legal name and the FIP name. The portfolio was created 12 Dec 2003. The House of Commons passed bill C-6 (53 Elizabeth II, 2004) An Act to establish the Department of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness Nov 17, 2004. It does not appear to have been passed by the Senate yet. Section two of this act uses the full legal name. So the other name is a Federal Identity Name. It is interesting that despite the Treasury Board explanation above, the government chose to give the department its full legal name, and not use an "applied title" in the bill creating the department.--BrentS 01:54, 7 Jan 2005 (UTC)
  • Oppose. Leave it where it is until and unless the Canadian legislature itself decides what it should be called. --Tony Sidaway|Talk 05:08, 7 Jan 2005 (UTC)

Page was moved, but is still inconsistent across other departments within the structure of the Canadian federal government. -- Netoholic @ 03:00, 2005 Jan 18 (UTC)

External links modified[edit]

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