Talk:Puerto Rico

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Former good article Puerto Rico was one of the Geography and places good articles, but it has been removed from the list. There are suggestions below for improving the article to meet the good article criteria. Once these issues have been addressed, the article can be renominated. Editors may also seek a reassessment of the decision if they believe there was a mistake.


Taking note of the new law of the land[edit]

On March 20, 2015, in Commonweath of Puerto Rico vs Sanchez Valle, an 8-1 majority of the SCOPR determined that PR is a territory and lacks sovereignty. That is now the law of the land in Puerto Rico. Thus, it would be disingenuous to describe PR as autonomous within the US and to describe "Commonwealth" as a "status". Thus I have changed the classification to "United States/Territory", which is factually correct regardless of POV, and described July 25 1952 as the date for the "Commonwealth Constitution" rather than "Commonwealth status". We can all agree that the constitution was promulgated on that date. Many, including the SCOPR, don't agree that a "status" different from territorial status was created on that day.

See http://www.ramajudicial.pr/ts/2015/201tspr25.pdf

On June 9, 2016, in Commonwealth of Puerto Rico vs Sanchez Valle, an 6-2 majority of the SCOTUS determined that Puerto Rico is a territory and lacks sovereignty. That is now the law of the land in the United States of America.

See http://www.supremecourt.gov/opinions/15pdf/15-108_k4mp.pdf

H.R. 5278: PROMESA is Law - President Obama sign the law on June 30, 2016.[edit]

H.R. 5278: PROMESA is Law - President Obama sign the law on June 30, 2016.

This shall be included on the article:

This is a law approved on June, 30, 2016, which would establish a financial control board in Puerto Rico, with the power of making sweeping cuts in order to deal with $72 billion debt. The control board power is over the Puerto Rico Government.

108.Autonomy of Oversight Board

(a)In general.—

Neither the Governor nor the Legislature may—

(1)exercise any control, supervision, oversight, or review over the Oversight Board or its activities; or


(2)enact, implement, or enforce any statute, resolution, policy, or rule that would impair or defeat the purposes of this Act, as determined by the Oversight Board.


(b)Oversight Board legal representation.—

In any action brought by, on behalf of, or against the Oversight Board, the Oversight Board shall be represented by such counsel as it may hire or retain so long as the representation complies with the applicable professional rules of conduct governing conflicts of interests.

MAJOR PROVISIONS Under the United States Constitution, the federal government retains sovereign authority to govern U.S. territories and insular areas. H.R. 5278 would create a legal framework for the federal government to establish oversight boards with broad authority to exercise control over the fiscal and budgetary affairs of U.S. territories.1 The bill also would outline procedures under which territorial governments could restructure public debt, subject to the approval of any such oversight boards established on their behalf. In general, oversight boards would be established only at the request of territorial governments; however, H.R. 5278 would automatically establish an oversight board for the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, which currently faces a financial crisis. It has already failed to make scheduled payments to service the territory’s outstanding public debt—which currently totals more than $70 billion—and further defaults are widely viewed as inevitable.2

To help Puerto Rico address its mounting financial difficulties, the bill would establish a seven-member Financial Oversight and Management Board (hereafter, the board) that would assume control over fiscal and budgetary decisions of the Puerto Rican government, including its municipalities, agencies, and public corporations (hereafter, instrumentalities). The President would appoint all seven members of the board, six of whom would be chosen among individuals recommended by Congressional leaders. The Governor of Puerto Rico (or a designee) would serve on the board as an ex officio member without voting rights.

the significant degree of federal control involved in its establishment and operations. In particular:  The authority to establish the oversight board derives from the federal government’s constitutional power to “make all needful rules and regulations” regarding U.S. territories;4  The President would appoint all seven voting members of the board; and  The board would have broad sovereign powers to effectively overrule decisions by Puerto Rico’s legislature, governor, and other public authorities.

Ref: http://inewstoday.net/2016/07/obama-signs-bill-to-prevent-financial-disaster-in-puerto/

Ref: https://policy.house.gov/legislative/bills/hr-5278-puerto-rico-oversight-management-and-economic-stability-act-2016-promesa — Preceding unsigned comment added by 24.139.162.147 (talk) 03:27, 5 July 2016 (UTC)

BRIEF FOR THE UNITED STATES AS AMICUS CURIAE SUPPORTING RESPONDENTS[edit]

BRIEF FOR THE UNITED STATES AS AMICUS CURIAE SUPPORTING RESPONDENTS - In the Supreme Court of the United States COMMONWEALTH OF PUERTO RICO, PETITIONER v. LUIS M. SANCHEZ VALLE, ET AL.

Official position of the U.S. Government submitted to the U.S. Supreme Court. Puerto Rico is a mere territory without Sovereignty.

In the Supreme Court of the United States No. 15-108 COMMONWEALTH OF PUERTO RICO, PETITIONER v. LUIS M. SANCHEZ VALLE, ET AL. ON WRIT OF CERTIORARI TO THE SUPREME COURT OF PUERTO RICO BRIEF FOR THE UNITED STATES AS AMICUS CURIAE SUPPORTING RESPONDENTS INTEREST OF THE UNITED STATES This case presents the question whether Puerto Rico and the United States are separate sovereigns for purposes of the Double Jeopardy Clause. The Court’s decision will affect how the federal government enforces federal criminal laws within Puerto Rico. It also may affect the federal government’s defense of federal legislation and policies related to Puerto Rico across a broad range of substantive areas, including congressional representation, federal benefits, federal income taxes, bankruptcy, and defense. Accordingly, the United States has a substantial interest in this case.

The task force’s 2005 report explained that “Puerto Rico is, for purposes under the U.S. Constitution, a territory,” and therefore is “subject to congressional authority, under the Constitution’s Territory Clause.” 2005 Task Force Report 5 (internal quotation marks omitted). Congress could “continue the current system indefinitely, but it also may revise or revoke it at any time,” and Congress cannot enter into an arrangement with Puerto Rico that “could not be altered without the ‘mutual consent’ of Puerto Rico and the [F]ederal Government.” Id. at 5-6. “The Federal Government may relinquish United States sovereignty by granting independence or ceding the territory to another nation; or it may * * * admit a territory as a State,” but “the U.S. Constitution does not allow other options.” Id. at 6. In 2007 and 2011, the task force took “a fresh look at the issue” and reached the same conclusion. 2011 Task Force Report 24-26; see 2007 Task Force Report 5-7. 7 — Preceding unsigned comment added by 24.139.162.147 (talk) 16:54, 10 July 2016 (UTC)

Reference: http://www.scotusblog.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/US-amicus-brief-in-Valle-15-108.pdf — Preceding unsigned comment added by 24.139.162.147 (talk) 16:48, 10 July 2016 (UTC)

SUPREME COURT OF THE UNITED STATES Syllabus COMMONWEALTH OF PUERTO RICO ET AL. v. FRANKLIN CALIFORNIA TAX-FREE TRUST ET AL.[edit]

SUPREME COURT OF THE UNITED STATES Syllabus COMMONWEALTH OF PUERTO RICO ET AL. v. FRANKLIN CALIFORNIA TAX-FREE TRUST ET AL. CERTIORARI TO THE UNITED STATES COURT OF APPEALS FOR THE FIRST CIRCUIT No. 15–233. Argued March 22, 2016—Decided June 13, 2016*

This case decided by the U.S. Supreme Court on June 13, 2016 also reaffirmed the territorial status of Puerto Rico. Supreme Court Rejects Puerto Rico Law in Debt Restructuring Case.

Ref: http://www.supremecourt.gov/opinions/15pdf/15-233_i42j.pdf

Ref: http://www.nytimes.com/2016/06/14/us/politics/supreme-court-rules-against-puerto-rico-in-debt-restructuring-case.html?_r=0 — Preceding unsigned comment added by 24.139.162.147 (talk) 18:16, 10 July 2016 (UTC)

External links modified[edit]

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Republican Party Platform 2016 Approved on 07/18/16 - The Territory of Puerto Rico - Republican Party support the right of the United States citizens of Puerto Rico to be admitted to the Union as a fully sovereign state.[edit]

Republican Party Platform 2016 Approved on 07/18/16 - Please add this to the article. This is related to the United States Citizens residing on Puerto Rico.

The Territory of Puerto Rico

We support the right of the United States citizens of Puerto Rico to be admitted to the Union as a fully sovereign state. We further recognize the historic significance of the 2012 local referendum in which a 54 percent majority voted to end Puerto Rico’s current status as a U.S. territory, and 61 percent chose statehood over options for sovereign nationhood. We support the federally sponsored political status referendum authorized and funded by an Act of Congress in 2014 to ascertain the aspirations of the people of Puerto Rico. Once the 2012 local vote for statehood is ratified, Congress should approve an enabling act with terms for Puerto Rico’s future admission as the 51st state of the Union.

Reference: https://prod-static-ngop-pbl.s3.amazonaws.com/media/documents/DRAFT_12_FINAL[1]-ben_1468872234.pdf