Talk:Puffed grain

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You forgot to put corn on your list. Corn Cakes are used much the same way as Rice Cakes. In the USA, "Rice Cakes" refers to puffed rice cakes. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 69.115.208.61 (talk) 08:17, 11 November 2016 (UTC)


Other products like Rice Krispies[edit]

Hello Amorrow!

Thank you very much for puffing up this article! There's only one thing I'm a bit confused about: You changed the description of Rice Krispies that they are not puffed grain. However, there is still the mention of "Other products like Rice Krispies" as an example for puffed grain. Was this just overlooked?

Respectfully, Common Man 08:57, 14 May 2005 (UTC)

Hi. This article answered a lot of my questions, but can you tell me what the "containment vessel" is? Are you talking about the hull surrounding the individual grain's kernal? Or the pressure cooker? What is the "seal" that get's broken? Thanks!

Emanuel - draviso@yahoo.com

Emanuel, it's not really a what most people think of as a pressure cooker. The "shot from guns" terminology is fairly good. At one end of the gun barrel, you have the grain being accelerated by live steam and at the other end of the barrel, the grain escapes, and the internal pressure of the steam makes the grain explode. It's then rapidly cooled and dehydrated so that the grain doesn't collapse upon itself.

ClairSamoht 08:06, 22 January 2006 (UTC)

The link to "rice cakes" redirects to the article about mochi, a Japanese snack made from boiled (not puffed) rice.

Shot from Guns[edit]

Quaker was using the "shot from guns" advertising slogan as early as the 1930's; so, it would not seem to be inspired by a manufacturing change made in the 1950's. I'm not sure how best to update the paragraph.

Cdixon 14:57, 27 March 2007 (UTC)

Yuba?[edit]

Last I checked, yuba had nothing to do with puffed soybeans. 72.196.104.129 04:37, 16 June 2007 (UTC)

I'm japanese and I know yuba well, but it never be made by puffed grains. --Hachikou (talk) 12:58, 26 August 2008 (UTC)

Puffing in general[edit]

Puffed grain is the result of a process developed by Dr. Alexander P. Anderson

Name the process, and make a more general page about puffing, as non-grains can also be puffed, as you mention. Jidanni 12:14, 28 September 2007 (UTC)

Quinoa[edit]

I suppose quinoa could be puffed as well, does anyone have any reference? --Gumruch (talk) 22:59, 27 February 2010 (UTC)

Also known as Murmura/Mamra in India[edit]

Puffed Rice is also known as MurMura in India. It is highly used in snacks. It is also said as meal of poor. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 219.64.193.245 (talk) 10:27, 1 September 2010 (UTC)

Amaranth grain or not grain?[edit]

As I read the page I was curious about quinoa among the non-grains and its page claims amaranth is also a psuedocereal and not a cereal. So shouldn't amaranth also be in the non-grain section? — Preceding unsigned comment added by 71.80.252.203 (talk) 07:45, 24 September 2016 (UTC)

Terminology in the article was wrong and confusing. I changed it. Everything here could be called a grain, except perhaps Euryale ferox (which is perhaps more considered a nut) and soybeans. I'm sure the author meant cereal, i.e. derived from a grass species. Note many other beans are traditionally puffed, such as peas or chickpeas in Turkish/Arabic snacks. Note also emping in Indonesia from Gnetum gnemon nuts. Furthermore, using modern (or traditional Asian) production methods any starchy food can be 'puffed', as is often done with modern potato or cassava snacks, but anything from plantain bananas, acorns, arrow root, tiger nuts, pine nuts, chestnuts, sago palm to konyak could be used as feedstock for the extruding process. Frankly, even dried shrimp or fish paste, noodles, and cattle skin can and are 'puffed', i.e. in the modern iteration of traditional Indonesian and Malaysian kripik. It should even be possible to 'puff' dried vegetables like beets or turnips with modern machinery, as long as they are starchy enough. Lastly, regarding amaranth, note that there are a number of species cultivated, almost all as a leaf vegetable. Only the Mexican grain type is puffed, so what is written about amaranth in the article is inaccurate.

This article is extremely US-centric. Sort of annoying that some American is credited for inventing a process which had been used in China for previous centuries. The article should perhaps also better differentiate between seeds which can be popped as opposed to the foods which are puffed. Leo86.83.56.115 (talk) 20:28, 13 September 2017 (UTC)