Talk:Quake engine

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Quake family tree[edit]

The EA games on this diagram are horribly inaccurate. Nightfire was developed by Eurocom for EA using their in-house technology which is not based on Quake. The Bond game that used Quake code is 007 Agent Under Fire for PS2, Xbox, and NGC. The correct way to draw the tree is to show it coming from Ritual's FAKK codebase. On a separate branch from that you should show Alice which also came from FAKK. Then lastly you could show James Bond 007 Everything or Nothing linked off of 007 Agent Under Fire as it was based off the AUF codebase. Lgascoig (talk) 14:18, 14 April 2008 (UTC)

It's also missing the ioquake3 engine, and the game tremulous built of that. --Chrispy (talk) 16:15, 14 April 2008 (UTC)

Merge or not[edit]

I do not think that Quake engine should be merged with Quake. Doom and Doom engine are separate, and the quake engine is used for Quake, Quake II, Hexen, and will be referenced with each of them. Also the article is a stub and cannot be merged yet. Watsonladd

If I'm not mistaken, Quake II, III and the Doom III engines were written from scratch. They may be based on similiar concepts to the original Quake engine, but I'm pretty sure they don't borrow any code. Doom III in particular is written in a completely objected oriented language, Q3 and previous engines were all procedural.

I was under the same impression. Is anyone familiar with the Q2 engine (now GPL) and also the Q1 engine? What is your analysis? --ChrisRuvolo (t) 23:24, 31 May 2005 (UTC)
Comparing the Quake 2 and Quake 1 sources, it's pretty obvious that the Q2 engine is an enhanced Q1.
Quake 3 is Quake2 based that is Quake1 based that is QuakeWorld based that is a Quake1 based. Quake Family Tree --Tei

But oddly enough there is more information about the quake engine (techincal details) on the quake page than here. Maybe the information should be transferred here, which would have the nice side effect of shortening the quake article. anton 24.201.100.166 17:43, 22 September 2007 (UTC)


Half-Life[edit]

Half-Life's GoldSrc engine is a (heavily) modified version of the Quake engine ... should I mention it here somewhere? I'm not entirely sure it'd work under Derivative Engines, since Half-Life was released in 1998 and Carmack released the engine in 1999 ... --Yar Kramer 13:03, 6 September 2005 (UTC)

Half-Life's engine is based on the Quake II engine. It was done as a proprietary source license (i.e. for money, not under the GPL). I don't think this is worth mentioning in this article since the relationship is not direct. --ChrisRuvolo (t) 18:06, 6 September 2005 (UTC)
A bit late, but... It's derived from Q1. Only some minor fixes from Q2 were included. Get your facts straight. dethtoll 17:45, 12 June 2007 (UTC)
Ah, all right. Works for me. --Yar Kramer 19:43, 6 September 2005 (UTC)


I hope this works, haven't worked with a wiki often. Regarding to this article (http://collective.valve-erc.com/index.php?doc=1028244478-62628500), Half-Life is based on a heavily modified Quake engine. The Quake2 engine part is rather small. I think you should add Half-Life. (In the Half-Life entry they say "Quake engine" as well ;) - Cheers, Spirit

Half-Life should be listed in the "games using the quake engine" section. The source engine should too. (By the way, both Sin and Daikatana use the Quake 2 engine.) 189.34.0.70 (talk) 11:49, 23 June 2008 (UTC)

007 Night fire is listed under Quake 3 here, but on its own page its listed as stemming form the Gold Source Engine. Further more the Gold Source page has a sourced quote that states it used bug fixes from Quake 2 Engine. Should these changes be made in the SWG image? — Preceding unsigned comment added by Valarauca (talkcontribs) 15:13, 6 December 2013 (UTC)

I'm not that familiar with the Half Life engine, I know there's debate about which version of Quake it's based on.. but I thought I'd mention that the id Software page lists it as being based on Quake 2. http://www.idsoftware.com/business/idtech2/ 203.109.146.32 (talk) 00:46, 23 March 2009 (UTC)

Not happy.[edit]

This article is horrible. Need tons of edits to become a usefull one. I am not happy with this. --Tei

If you make yourself happy by improving this article, you will also be making others happy. Gronky 09:44, 21 August 2007 (UTC)

Video formats?[edit]

So... what resolutions and color depths did the original Quake engine support? —Preceding unsigned comment added by 70.68.70.186 (talk) 22:39, 13 December 2007 (UTC)

The default support was either 320x200 or 320x240 and 256 colors in DOS... the same as DOOM.
Quake and other games were very hard to get working at higher resolutions back in the days of DOS. It was usually necessary to find a VESA support driver to get higher resolutions like 640x480 @ 256 colors working. I remember having to use SciTech Display Doctor with DOS Quake.
You can find Display Doctor and other old VESA video drivers here: http://www.dosdriver.de/graph.php
DMahalko (talk) 00:03, 24 February 2012 (UTC)

Brushes[edit]

Currently, the article says the following:

The brushes are overlapped in order to create an enclosed, empty, volumetric space, and when the design is complete the map is run through the rendering preprocessor.

It has been a long time since I edited Quake maps, but if I remember correctly, brushes should never overlap. Doing so results in unnecesary splitting by the map compiler, which in turn makes the map slower to render, and can even cause drawing problems like Z-fighting.

--Pezezin (talk) 14:56, 4 February 2008 (UTC)

You're right. I never did an enormous amount of editing for Quake or Quake II, but I remember the same rule. Brushes should form a fully enclosed space, but overlapping brushes is a Bad Thing (TM). Lee.crabtree (talk) 16:54, 13 February 2008 (UTC)

Impact on modern game design[edit]

I suggest stripping down this section to the essential. Most of it is nearly irrelevant, or is repeating what is said in "Reducing 3D complexity to increase speed". Laurent (talk) 16:24, 7 December 2008 (UTC)

Ok I've removed nearly all of it. Actually I think it should be rewritten based on verifiable sources as it's quite difficult to evaluate the impact of a game engine on the other engines. Laurent (talk) 20:38, 11 January 2009 (UTC)

Resident Evil 2 is surely not using the quake engine.....[edit]

i know both games, also from the technical sides.

a google search also did not reveal any sources for this.

79.110.95.2 (talk) 09:11, 12 August 2010 (UTC)

Advanced Quake engines[edit]

What constitutes an "advanced" engine? I would argue that as of this date, several engines are as advanced as Darkplaces, for example FTEQW and DirectQ. These two should at least go into the list of Quake 1 engine ports. - GB 46.142.13.95 (talk) 19:07, 30 January 2012 (UTC)

Quake Engine = id Tech 1 or 2?[edit]

This article says that Quake’s engine was id Tech 2. The id Tech article says it was called id Tech 1. Which is it? —Frungi (talk) 04:26, 6 August 2012 (UTC)

Actually, since both that article and id Tech 2 (which redirects to Quake II engine) say that id Tech 2 was developed for Quake II (and not the original), any objections if I just delete the alternate name here? —Frungi (talk) 04:59, 6 August 2012 (UTC)

Done. —Frungi (talk) 15:29, 8 August 2012 (UTC)

I don't know, but File:Quake - family tree 2.svg suggests Quake's engine is called "id Tech 2-0"... --Chealer (talk) 17:11, 22 October 2013 (UTC)
idtech1 was everything before Quake1. Quake Engine is used for e.g. Quake1 and QuakeWorld. idtech2 is used for Quake2. There have been separate GPL releases for all three technologies and that is relevant. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 79.194.231.196 (talk) 17:35, 11 November 2015 (UTC)
Also the citation [1] does /not/ mention Quake(1) as an example of id Tech 2 https://web.archive.org/web/20080917045739/http://www.idsoftware.com/business/idtech2/ — Preceding unsigned comment added by 79.194.231.196 (talk) 17:42, 11 November 2015 (UTC)
Actually it kind of does: "Games created on this engine technology include QUAKE II, Hexen II, Heretic II, Sin, Soldier Of Fortune, Half-Life, Kingpin and Anachronox." Emphasis mine. Hexen II is based off the original Quake engine not Quake II. Similarly Half-Life is a fork from the original Quake with some parts of Quake II code. Blzut3 (talk) 07:53, 13 December 2015 (UTC)

No references[edit]

I don’t see any references whatsoever in this entire article, aside from the two at the very beginning supporting the alternate name (and I’m not even sure about those two). So I’ve added {{refimprove}} and {{original research}} to it. —Frungi (talk) 04:43, 6 August 2012 (UTC)

Infobox updates[edit]

Hey everyone. Just finished adding additional information and added a Quake screenshot into the "infobox". Screenshot configured to be displayed at 320 pixels, widening the infobox and narrowing the paragraphs of text to the left. Screenshot-infobox I think is at a comfortable size. — Preceding unsigned comment added by BenjaminRose1991 (talkcontribs) 05:48, 20 April 2014 (UTC)

is the quake engine still available for licensing commercially[edit]

want to create a new game and sell it for 60 bucks but i dont want to release source code — Preceding unsigned comment added by Thetechwizard21 (talkcontribs) 03:51, 7 July 2016 (UTC)