Talk:Queer studies

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worldwide perspective?[edit]

Can anyone address the is issues of this tag? -- Banjeboi 14:45, 15 March 2009 (UTC)

Excessive Citation[edit]

This article has too many citations, impeding its readability (many citations are simply recycled). Please edit and re-cite using accepted practices. Every sentence does not need a citation.

Brown University[edit]

By 1995, Brown University had a major called Sexuality & Society, just a synonym for LGBT Studies. I believe it is now combined with Women's Studies and the combined major is called Gender & Sexuality Studies. But here's the point: Brown University may have been the first Ivy League institution to have an LGBT Studies major. I don't have the cites at the moment, but readers should keep this in mind. Brown did it before Yale and Harvard. Recognize! — Preceding unsigned comment added by Chumley41 (talkcontribs) 00:55, 15 August 2015 (UTC)

Biased[edit]

This article fails to note or address the controversy surrounding use of the term "queer." The term was introduced and advanced by the more radical elements of the movement, but it never caught on in the GLBT community at large, with the majority resenting it, not embracing it. Many liken it to the African-American adaptation of the "N" word, and reject it. At least one of the movers and shakers who initially pushed adoption of the term later wrote an editorial calling for its abandonment for that reason. Conservatives often accuse our universities of being leftist and too "politically correct." Although I'm not generally sympathetic to that assertion, calling people "queer" might lend some credence to it. There are strong feelings about this, and I'm sure the left-wing element won't appreciate my note here. But I hope it's not removed, and I hope someone with the time, expertise and resources will provide a "Controversy" section in the main article, with adequate footnoting. —Preceding unsigned comment added by ChicagoLarry (talkcontribs) 16:38, 17 February 2010 (UTC)

Larry, do you have some sources for what you've said? If it's in a book or journal, we can use it. The Sound and the Fury (talk) 13:50, 15 March 2010 (UTC)
I well remember an editorial, but don't know if I can find it... will get to looking into it eventually. Thanks. ChicagoLarry. —Preceding unsigned comment added by ChicagoLarry (talkcontribs) 16:43, 20 April 2010 (UTC)
Sound&Fury, there are many published discussions of the reclaiming of "queer" and the declining interest in it, but I just don't have the time to research this; I'm hoping someone else will. At the very least, this article can better acknowledge a controversy about this. For starters, check out the entry for "queer" in Wayne R. Dynes' "Homolexis Glossary." The great (recently deceased) gay activist and writer Paul Varnell has an article about this, here: http://igfculturewatch.com/2000/02/09/whats-wrong-with-queer-2/ I'm confident he wrote about it more than once, and I think it was he (not sure) who wrote a column citing a couple of community leaders who originally embraced "queer" and later abandoned it. It's hard to zero in on a specific article using Google due to the search terms being so commonly used.
Also, there are many Google entries re a Harvey Milk quote, " I am not queer, I am gay." My fear is (and forgive my cynicism, but I've had a long time to develop it!) that the guardians of the word "queer" won't allow this page (and/or related ones) to adequately address this controversy. To suggest we need citations even to acknowledge it is, to me, like saying we'd need a citation to assert that people love sunshine! There are many published discussions of this, if someone has a burden to research it and digest it—and has the time to do it. 24.148.58.206 (talk) 19:08, 31 March 2012 (UTC)
You could look at what universities call their departments that deal with these issues. My university calls it LGBT Studies. I have the LGBT Studies certificate from that university (UW-Madison), and it has always been my experience that "queer" is more politically charged and, in an academic context, deals more with literary/art theory and philosophy. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 76.210.64.209 (talk) 17:44, 18 April 2010 (UTC)

Clearer differentiation from queer theory needed[edit]

The title says it all. If anyone can assist, that would be good. The Sound and the Fury (talk) 14:39, 15 March 2010 (UTC)

No takers? The Sound and the Fury (talk) 10:17, 17 March 2010 (UTC)

Tags[edit]

I removed a series of large tags from the top of the article; did anyone intend to fix those problems? The Sound and the Fury (talk) 14:52, 7 November 2010 (UTC)

What is Queer Studies?[edit]

After reading this entry, I know more about the establishment of LGBT courses and departments in higher education, but very little about Queer Studies beyond the fact that it involves the LGBT experience. What are some of the major themes of this discipline? What about its critical method? What are some foundational texts? What would I learn in a Queer Studies course that I wouldn't learn in a general course about "Sexuality in X"? This should be discussed in the body/text of the entry.

There needs to be more substance beyond "Queer Studies involves psychology, literary theory, sociology,...." kind of statements. This article seems to assume that the reader already knows what Queer Studies is and has done some reading on the topic. It needs to be less about establishing the history of departments and who came first and more outlining the academic discipline because it actually doesn't tell the reader much about what Queer Studies IS. 69.125.134.86 (talk) 10:47, 15 June 2013 (UTC)

I see much of what I'm looking for lies in the Queer Theory entry but I still think that there could be more descriptive content to Queer Studies than what exists right now. Surely Queer Studies involve a plurality of critical perspectives and isn't solely based on Queer Theory. 69.125.134.86 (talk) 10:52, 15 June 2013 (UTC)

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  I agree that there needs to be a further distinction on the difference between queer studies and queer theory, but one simple, quick solution would be to clarify the sentence. Here's the sentence I'm talking about:

"Queer studies is not the same as queer theory, an analytical viewpoint within queer studies (centered on literary studies and philosophy) that challenges the putatively "socially constructed" categories of sexual identity.[2]"

I think it would be beneficial for clarity if I added a "which is" after "queer theory". It makes the sentence easier to read, especially for people who don't actually understand the difference between the two. Let me know if anyone has any further ideas! Tisamerefleshwound (talk) 04:19, 15 September 2016 (UTC)Tisamerefleshwound

Queer Studies at non-U.S. Universities[edit]

Since this page is flagged as not having a world view, I am proposing to add a section on queer studies at foreign universities. It is difficult to find credible sources on this subject, but I did find one on Fudan University in Shanghai. I would add a new section to the Queer Studies page called "Queer Studies at non-U.S. Universities" and would begin with a paragraph on Fudan University that reads: In 2003, the School of Public Health University at Fudan University in Shanghai, China opened its first course on homosexuality. The course is called Homosexual Health and Social Sciences and is designed to have a multi-disciplinary approach, with lectures focused on social sciences, humanities, and public health. Only one student was enrolled in 2003, but the course was open to the public and average attendance for that year was 89.9. The enrollment and average attendance in 2004 increased to 2 and 114, respectively. [1]

Let me know if anyone has any suggestions Tisamerefleshwound (talk) 01:49, 26 September 2016 (UTC)Tisamerefleshwound


Here's a substantial contribution to the non-U.S. Universities section:

Fudan University, located in Shanghai, China opened a course on homosexuality and AIDS prevention in 2003 entitled “Homosexual Health Social Sciences.” In an article focusing on this college course, Gao and Gu utilize feedback from participants, detailed interviews with professors and a review of course documents to discuss China’s first course with homosexuality at its core. Their article analyzes the tactics used to create such a course and strategies used to protect the course from adverse reactions in the press. The authors especially take note of the effects of the course on its attendees and the wider gay community in China. The authors note that “Homosexual Health Social Sciences” was described as a “breakthrough” by South China Morning Post and Friends’ Correspondence, a periodical for gay health intervention. The course was developed to be interdisciplinary to cover the social sciences, humanities, and public health. Interdependence on different academic focuses was achieved in the curriculum by covering “Theories of homosexuality and Chinese reality”, “homosexual sub-culture” and “MSM intervention in HIV prevention” in addition to reading literature with gay characters and themes and taking field trips to a gay bar.

The article then describes attendance of this course and its significance by explaining that the official registration in the class was low, with only one student in 2003 and 2 in 2004, but the attendance of non-registered is very high because the course is open to the public. The average attendance in 2003 was 89.9 and rose to 114 in 2004. Surveys were given to attendees of the class and many responded that the class helped them understand the homosexual perspective better. One student stated that “Even if we cannot fully understand these people, we need to respect them. That is the basis for real communication.” Many of the course attendees admitted that the course changed their lives. One Chinese police officer had been hiding his sexuality his entire life stated “The course really enhanced my quality of life…” Another man who had been prescribed treatment for his homosexuality for 30 years heard talk of the course in a newspaper and expressed “This precious news has relieved my heart.”

Gao and Gu also note of the precautions that were taken by the creators of the course to shelter the new class from harsh criticism. The authors describe how the professors were very careful in its beginning to not attract too much attention from mass media. The creators were afraid that if the course got too much negative attention from the Chinese public that it would be canceled. Most coverage on this Fudan University course was in English at the beginning. This phenomenon was explained by one journalist from China Radio International—Homosexuality is very sensitive issue in Chinese culture so by discussing it in English, it is distanced from the conservative Chinese culture.[2]

While researching this I was hit with a language barrier. I think there are more scholarly articles out there on queer studies courses at foreign universities, but they aren't written in English. If other editors that speak foreign languages could search for articles written in other languages, I think they really could contribute a lot to this article. Tisamerefleshwound (talk) 15:59, 14 October 2016 (UTC)Tisamerefleshwound

I think it's rather an excessive amount about this rather small project at Fudan University in the article as it is right now.
I know of one case in Brazil. the "VIII Congresso Internacional de Estudos sobre a Diversidade Sexual e de Gênero" was this year in june in the Federal University of Juiz de Fora -'eighth international congress on studies of sexual diversity and gender'.
--User:Dwarf Kirlston - talk 13:38, 19 December 2016 (UTC)

More Articles for New non-U.S. Section[edit]

Here are some articles I found that I would like to use to contribute to this article. Check them out and let me know if anyone has any questions or comments.

[3]

[4]

[5]

[6]

[7]

[8] -unsigned comment left by User:Tisamerefleshwound at 2016-10-27T20:38:48‎

I think ref tags are usually discouraged in Talk pages, I'm not sure. In any case I don't think they're too much of a bother. I would remove them myself, but I'm lazy and I think they're minimally useful - a person would only have to copy/paste to include them in the article--User:Dwarf Kirlston - talk 13:28, 19 December 2016 (UTC)
    • ^ Yanning, Gao; Gu, Steven (2006). "The Course on Homosexuality at Fudan University: Make a "Hole" to "Borrow" Light from Humanities and Social Sciences for Public Health Education in Mainland China". Journal of Gay & Lesbian Issues in Education. 3 (4): 87–95. doi:10.1300/J367v03n04_08. 
    • ^ Yanning, Gao; Gu, Steven (2006). "The Course on Homosexuality at Fudan University: Make a "Hole" to "Borrow" Light from Humanities and Social Sciences for Public Health Education in Mainland China". Journal of Gay & Lesbian Issues in Education. 3 (4): 87–95. doi:10.1300/J367v03n04_08. 
    • ^ Harned, Jon; Bredbeck, Gregory; Gonzalez, Maria; Waldrep, Shelton (1996). "Queer Studies and the Job Market: Three Perspectives". Profession: 82–90. Retrieved 29 September 2016. 
    • ^ Berlant, Lauren (Winter 1994). "FORUM: On the Political Implications of Using the Term 'Queer,' as in 'Queer Politics,' 'Queer Studies,' and 'Queer Pedagogy'". The Radical Teacher (45): 52–57. Retrieved 29 September 2016. 
    • ^ Whittington, Carl (2012). "QUEER". Studies in Iconography. 33 (Special Issue Medieval Art History Today—Critical Terms): 157–168. Retrieved 29 September 2016. 
    • ^ Ecker, John; Rae, Jennifer (November 2015). "Showing your pride: a national survey of queer student centres in Canadian colleges and universities". Higher Education. 70 (5): 881–898. doi:10.1007/s10734-015-9874-x. 
    • ^ Costa, Angelo Brandelli; et al. "Prejudice Toward Gender and Sexual Diversity in a Brazilian Public University: Prevalence, Awareness, and the Effects of Education". Sexual Research and Social Policy. 14 (4): 261–272. doi:10.007/s13178-015-019-z. 
    • ^ Evans, Nancy J.; Herriot, Todd (May/June 2004). "Freshman Impressions: How Investigating the Campus Climate for LGTBQ Students Affected Four Freshman Students". Journal of College and Student Development. 45 (3): 317–331.  Check date values in: |date= (help);