Talk:Radium dials

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This page says that production peaked during the 1900 decade, but another (linked to it) says that the paint was invented in 1908. Some cross-checking seems warranted. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 64.124.61.215 (talk) 19:57, 2 June 2014 (UTC)


The sentence "One estimate of radiation exposure caused by wearing a watch painted with radium is 10-1000 millirads." is confusing: millirad is a dose, not a dose rate (dose per time). Thus, one would have to specify how long one must wear such a watch in order to absorb this dose. Andre.holzner (talk) 21:31, 28 August 2011 (UTC)

Replacement?[edit]

"radium dials have largely been replaced by tritium based light sources." What about phosphorescent light sources too? most normal watches only have phosphorescent glow, tritium watch faces don't seem common at all, and most other consumer products with glow is phosphorescence not radioluminescence, so it's surly just as much a replacement. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 83.100.195.46 (talk) 22:43, 15 April 2012 (UTC)

I certainly agree. I revised the article to reflect this. Thanks! Scientific29 (talk) 23:17, 15 April 2012 (UTC)

Removal of source[edit]

I had to remove this from article due to ambiguity. See my edit summary. I like to saw logs! (talk) 04:30, 8 February 2013 (UTC)

One estimate of radiation exposure caused by wearing a watch painted with radium is 10-1000 millirads.[1]
  1. ^ Frigierio, Norman (1967). Your Body and Radiation. U.S. Atomic Energy Commission.