Talk:Recrystallization (chemistry)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
WikiProject Chemistry (Rated C-class, High-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Chemistry, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of chemistry on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
C-Class article C  This article has been rated as C-Class on the project's quality scale.
 High  This article has been rated as High-importance on the project's importance scale.
 
WikiProject Glass  
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Glass, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of glass on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
 ???  This article has not yet received a rating on the quality scale.
 ???  This article has not yet received a rating on the importance scale.
 

Why is the packing-together of atoms described as a purely physical, non-chemical process? If coal is packed into diamond, then isn't this a chemical process? MisterSheik

  • Yes and no. Coal being packed into diamond is a chemical process because the structure of diamond actually involves a covalent bonding network. Generally speaking, the types of crystals formed by more complex molecules (i.e. the kind you would want to purify by recrystallization) are held together by simpler electronic effects (i.e. London and dipole forces) rather than actual chemical bonds. In fact, Wikipedia has an article on crystalline compounds that would probably help you out a bit with this concept. --Elfer (talk) 16:36, 8 April 2008 (UTC)

Can this article be merged with "Fractional crystallization"?(Thinker2006 15:49, 23 February 2006 (UTC))

defintion[edit]

i think that you people should just give the definiton of the word and not a whole essay about recrystallition.

      • the whole purpose of an encyclopedia is information given such as this. I found it helpful because it answered the question I had about recrystallization. If I just wanted a definition, I would have looked it up in Webster's dictionary.

Agreed, Gaogier How can I help? 18:05, 9 April 2013 (UTC)


Ice[edit]

Is Ice referring to actual Ice (frozen water)? or the word "Ice" as in, large high quality crystals? I would suspect the latter but it truly lacks information. Gaogier How can I help? 18:06, 9 April 2013 (UTC)

Introduction[edit]

Please, someone who knows about this subject, improve upon "Recrystallization is a physical process." — Preceding unsigned comment added by VSohn (talkcontribs) 14:20, 31 July 2012 (UTC) Amazed that lasted so long. Replaced it with something relevant, at least. Silenceisgod (talk) 02:25, 25 February 2013 (UTC)

Single-solvent recrystallization drawing[edit]

The image under the above heading has numbered steps, the other drawings in this page do not (i.e. is not consistent). The numbers are redundant. The image should be reverted to the image from 18 March 2007 (before the numbers were added).

Before: https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/archive/4/4e/20141012101037%211_solvent_recrystallisation.png

Now: https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/archive/4/4e/20141012101407%211_solvent_recrystallisation.png

Also, the image without numbers is more useful as it can be used in non-Arabic numeral systems (e.g. Japanese).

Coaxed out?[edit]

A simple google search suggests that to coax out is not a scientific word, and is only used in this article's definition. "either the desired compound or impurities can be coaxed out of solution". I will replace it with remove, however please correct em if I am mistaken. — Preceding unsigned comment added by Russell's teapot (talkcontribs) 12:26, 10 March 2017 (UTC)