Talk:Red-necked wallaby

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odd line[edit]

As one of the largest wallabies, it can easily be mistaken for a kangaroo. - given that the line between something being a wallaby and a kangaroo is completely arbitrary in this genus, surely it is not mistaken for a kangaroo but sometimes considered one. Sabine's Sunbird talk 03:54, 12 August 2009 (UTC)

File:Macropus rufogriseus rufogriseus Juvenile 2.jpg to appear as POTD soon[edit]

Hello! This is a note to let the editors of this article know that File:Macropus rufogriseus rufogriseus Juvenile 2.jpg will be appearing as picture of the day on September 1, 2011. You can view and edit the POTD blurb at Template:POTD/2011-09-01. If this article needs any attention or maintenance, it would be preferable if that could be done before its appearance on the Main Page so Wikipedia doesn't look bad. :) Thanks! howcheng {chat} 19:11, 31 August 2011 (UTC)

Juvenile Bennett's Wallaby
A juvenile Bennett's Wallaby (Macropus rufogriseus rufogriseus), a subspecies of the Red-necked Wallaby, on Maria Island, east of Tasmania. Red-necked Wallabies can be found in the more temperate and fertile parts of eastern Australia. They can weigh 13.8 to 18.6 kg (30 to 41 lb) and attain a head–body length of 90 cm (35 in), with the island version slightly smaller.Photo: JJ Harrison


File:Macropus rufogriseus rufogriseus Bruny.jpg to appear as POTD soon[edit]

Hello! This is a note to let the editors of this article know that File:Macropus rufogriseus rufogriseus Bruny.jpg will be appearing as picture of the day on July 20, 2012. You can view and edit the POTD blurb at Template:POTD/2012-07-20. If this article needs any attention or maintenance, it would be preferable if that could be done before its appearance on the Main Page so Wikipedia doesn't look bad. :) Thanks! howcheng {chat} 18:12, 16 July 2012 (UTC)

Red-necked wallaby
The red-necked wallaby (Macropus rufogriseus ssp. rufogriseus shown here) is a medium-sized marsupial macropod, common in the more temperate and fertile parts of eastern Australia, including Tasmania. They can weigh 13.8 to 18.6 kg (30 to 41 lb) and attain a head–body length of 90 cm (35 in), with males being generally bigger than females. They are mainly solitary but will gather together when there is an abundance of resources such as food, water or shelter.Photo: JJ Harrison


Categorization[edit]

Grutness: please see WP:NONDEF: a defining characteristic is one that reliable, secondary sources commonly and consistently define, in prose, the subject as having. [...] if the characteristic would not be appropriate to mention in the lead portion of an article, it is probably not defining;. Being a symbol of a county or other polity is certainly not a defining characteristics of an animal species, ergo it shouldn't be in the Category:Waimate District. Including the wallaby in a category of a New Zealand district certainly opens a can of worms — otherwise, imagine the number of potential categories at Lion or Eagle. Of course, I don't mind mentioning Waimate District in running text; if you can find more examples, maybe a new section like "Cultural significance" would be justified (compare Lion#Cultural significance). No such user (talk) 11:33, 26 April 2016 (UTC)

It's a tricky one - it's not a defining characteristic of the wallaby, but it is a defining characteristic of Waimate District which, as I pointed out on your talk page, is widely referred to as "Wallaby country". It would be appropriate to mention Bennett's wallaby in the lede on Waimate District (although that article currently does not do so - it's in a later paragraph). However, I will bow to your opinion, given that similar examples are not so categorised (much to my surprise - I would have expected Barbary macaque to be in Category:Gibraltar, for instance). Grutness...wha? 12:23, 26 April 2016 (UTC)
Thanks. Well, there is a reasonably detailed Barbary macaques in Gibraltar article which serves as a meeting point between the two categories, but I suppose it would be an overkill to apply the same approach for the wallabies and Waimate. No such user (talk) 14:44, 26 April 2016 (UTC)