Talk:Reverse-transcriptase inhibitor

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Discussion[edit]

Understanding RTI provide a novel platform for the developing of anti-HIV medication. This is one area that GlaxoSmithKline needs to be commended.

Someone needs to explain why if these drugs are successful at preventing the RNA to DNA conversion step, why hasn't that resulted in an actual cure as is implied in the mechanism?

To answer that question, we need an expert to explain the patterns of resistance among NRTI's and NNRTI's (and the mutations involved) which is a problem among all antiviral and antimicrobials in general. --Tootyted (talk) 20:47, 22 October 2008 (UTC)

Other uses?[edit]

Are the reverse transcriptase inhibitors used against other viral infections as well? This article only talks about AIDS. 207.134.187.165 03:10, 1 December 2007 (UTC)

Yes, some NRTI's can be used for the treatment to Hepatitis B Virus infections (HBV). They include lamivudine (Epivir-HBV), *emtricitabine(Emtriva), and *Tenofovir (Viread). *Implicated in treatment but not yet approved by the FDA. --Tootyted (talk) 20:46, 22 October 2008 (UTC)

Incorrect/Deceptive information in article that was deleted.[edit]

In the section titled Nucleotide analog reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NtARTIs or NtRTIs), there is a statement that says "Taking nucleotide analog reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NtARTIs or NtRTIs) directly allows conversion steps to be skipped, causing less toxicity."

In the FDA's Warning Letter dated 29-Jul-2003[1] to the manufacturer of both listed drugs, it is specifically stated that "referring to Viread as a nucleotide in a way that conveyed that this confers an advantage over other drugs was not acceptable. In promotional materials references to the mechanistic descriptor “nucleotide analog” will be used without conveying that this is an advantage." Per the warning letter, the description listed in this article, therefore, is a violation of the Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act.

The text "causing less toxicity" has therefore been deleted. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 68.7.112.56 (talk) 22:48, 20 March 2009 (UTC)

side effects[edit]

is it possible to get a section about side effects? i think NRTIs can cause steatosis, but can't recall enough about it.. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 128.240.231.21 (talk) 13:08, 25 May 2010 (UTC)