Talk:Ric Richardson

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Patent Trolling[edit]

The former brief debate about whether or not Ric is a patent troll is now pretty funny to read in 2013 when Ric is perhaps the world's most famous patent troll. There should be some mention of what this Ric is ACTUALLY famous for: His company has had cases dismissed from court on the basis that you cannot "patent math" and at one point had 70-80 pending patent cases going. They are currently suing a large portion of the entire Android programming community. Our very own Uniloc article at least alludes to it and a quick google of "Uniloc" will make one's stomach turn. The current article is equivalent to an article on OJ Simpson that details his football career and doesn't mention anything else. Ric has long been more famous for his shameless patent trolling in backwards court districts against defenseless software companies than for actually inventing/developing anything. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 4.246.221.159 (talk) 07:13, 31 March 2013 (UTC)


back in Australia[edit]

Four Corners (TV program) reported tonight that he has moved back in Australia. John Vandenberg (chat) 11:01, 24 August 2009 (UTC)

Accusation of being a Patent Troll[edit]

Am I the only person that thinks he is a patent troll? None of his inventions are original, string connected to your glasses, data compression and now serial numbers for activation. Come on. Hullo exclamation mark (talk) 12:20, 25 August 2009 (UTC)

PS. I hate Microsoft, I'm using Fedora as I type this, but I hate software patents even more. Hullo exclamation mark (talk) 12:22, 25 August 2009 (UTC)
PS. The glasses cord project was quoted as an invention by the press but he never said it was an invention but more an entrepreneurial project with his brother(see the ricrichardson.com website). Also his project Logarex is not a claim to data compression in general but rather to a specific field using log tables and mathematical only compression. Wikipedia will be damaged if contributors make sweeping statements and don't stick to the facts.
PS. Re software patents. Software patents are disaalowed by the USPTO on the basis that they reprisent only an algorithm... and an algorithm can't be patented. Mr Richasrdsons patent refers to a system that involves multiple computers (hardware) and refers to a fingerprint made from information attached to computer peripherals / hardware. His patent does qualify under USPTO laws. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 124.170.155.163 (talk) 01:04, 9 July 2010 (UTC)

It doesn't look like a case of patent trolling. According to one news article: "Richardson showed the patented technology to Microsoft in 1993, but instead of licensing the software, the company developed its own almost identical version. The technology was incorporated into products during the late 1990s. "Trishm (talk) 08:57, 8 September 2009 (UTC)

  • Yes, but recently with the Mojang group of cases, it's a clear example of a very far reaching patent (use of a smart card for authentication, seen in almost every TV box), and applying to an even further reaching group (in this case, referencing whether a user is logged in and premium before giving him the game). Also, the fact he makes basic errors in his court application shows he is only doing it in an attempt to make money and not to protect his copyright. Jaredjeya (talk) 12:52, 23 July 2012 (UTC)
You are required by law to defend your patents, if you fail to do so you can lose them. But regardless of that. WP:TPNO - X201 (talk) 13:23, 23 July 2012 (UTC)

Protection[edit]

The article has been target to a number of vandals. It should be protected to protect vandalism. Port A Build (talk) 04:43, 4 August 2012 (UTC)