Talk:Saint Lawrence River

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Untitled[edit]

Does anyone know for whom the Saint Lawrence River was named? 166.90.234.48 08:03 Aug 12, 2002 (PDT)

I have every reason to believe that it is the Saint Lawrence who was the first papal librarian and who was martyred on a gridiron, not least because the symbol of the St. Lawrence Herald (a ceremonial office under the Governor-General) is a gridiron. -

"According to tradition, for his presumed impudence, Lawrence was then slowly roasted on a grill on the site of the Basilica di San Lorenzo in Rome, in the hope that he would publicly renounce his religion and reveal the names of the wealthy Christians. He is often represented holding a gridiron to memorialize this grisly manner of martyrdom. Although St. Lawrence was most certainly beheaded and not roasted, the traditions of his being cooked are somewhat stronger than actual fact. As a result, St Lawrence is also considered a patron saint for cooks." [1] --Eloquence

Old Name[edit]

PRESENTLY THE FIRST PARAGRAPH OF THE ARTICLE ON THE ST. LAWRENCE RIVER ENDS WITH THIS JOKE: as named after Lawrence Johnson (currently a teacher in LaGrange, Illinois) for his many incredible contributions to society and for generally being awesome. HOW THIS GOT ONLINE IS TO MY AWE, why not attribute this name after LAWRENCE WELK as an allegory to his flowing music... THE TRUTH ABOUT NAMING OF THE SAINT LAWRENCE RIVER IS When Jacques Cartier entered the River in 1534 it was the day catholics celebrate Saint Lawrence day so he named the River as Saint Lawrence in his journal where he also refers to it as the great river of Kanata, since he believed the country was named Kanata from what he first heard from the natives he met. Yet Kanata meant «my village». With hindsight one can appreciate the «Indian» Chief was inviting Cartier (who was aboard his ship) to come to his village. French and English archives from the XVIth century refer to the Great River as the Saint Lawrence. To get the first mention of LaGrange Illinois (1800's) one needs to consult with archives dating no sooner than the XIXth Century...sorry but Pr. Lawrence Johnson is 400 years late... Andretheguide Andretheguide (talk) 10:20, 3 September 2011 (UTC)

I understood that the old name "River Canada" (and French equivalent) was not used to describe the whole of the St Lawrence. Rather, it referred to the St Lawrence River as far upstream as Montreal and then to the Ottawa River, which was presumably once considered the chief tributary.

It is certainly shown this way on Morden's map of 1695 (although that was drawn in London by a man who probably never visited Canada :-). Does anyone have any more info? Cambyses 21:53, 11 Mar 2004 (UTC)

Fresh Water System[edit]

What exactly is a "fresh water system"? A link with a definition would be nice. By any definition I can think of, the Amazon is the world's largest fresh water system. Chl 21:04, 23 Aug 2004 (UTC)

That might depend on whether or not the Great Lakes are included... bneely 19:15, 17 Oct 2004 (UTC)
Drainage area of Amazon: 7 million km²; St Lawrence including Great Lakes: 1.03 million km². Average discharge of Amazon: 180,000 m³/s; St Lawrence: 10,400 m³/s. --Chl 16:31, 19 Oct 2004 (UTC)
The "largest" claim is based on the total volume of water in the system, not the discharge rate. Source: EPA. - Kmusser 3 August 2005

Origin[edit]

The article says the river starts in Ontario where the Great Lakes drain into it, while the infobox says it rises in Minnesota. I wouldn't consider the Great Lakes to be part of the river, though they are clearly at the heart of its basin. But I'm not a geographer, hydrologist, or cartographer. Any comments, or should I change its origin in the table to Ontario? Thanks, —Papayoung 18:40, 30 September 2005 (UTC)

Hi! Later in the article, the 'true' source for the St Lawrence is noted as being the North River in the Mesabi Range in Minnesota; it doesn't appear that way (i.e., with its source in Ontario) because the Great Lakes are so predominant and circuitous. (I decided to add the river table to add clarity and since it appears in other rivers; but I don't think there is a standard.)
So: more clarity is needed! I'd appreciate if both of these can be reconciled in text and through a little more digging. Thoughts? Thanks again! E Pluribus Anthony 18:59, 30 September 2005 (UTC)

Distinction between gulf and river needed[edit]

This article needs a comment on the issue where to draw the end-point on St. Lawrence as a river. As of now, there is none. I am aware of that the long gulf form Anticosti to about Québec city is often considered to be a part of St. Lawrence, but is that stretch really a river? If I'm not wrong, it's not, but the water lies at sea level and is brackish. Correct me if I'm worng and also comment to the article about the issue. 193.167.7.27 16:00, 7 April 2006 (UTC)

That's all estuary and is generally labeled as part of the river in commercial Atlases. I checked when working on the Gulf article and there doesn't seem to be a commonly accepted point where the river ends and the gulf begins. Kmusser 14:42, 7 June 2006 (UTC)
And perhaps one more question issued - the list of tributaries. It must have average discharge 5000-6000 cub.m/s near Ontario, so what was taken into account for final figure? It would be great to see in article.--Beaber (talk) 14:06, 26 February 2009 (UTC)

POV map[edit]

The map is POV, because it shows the counties in the US but doesn't show them in Canada. --curling rock Earl Andrew - talk 04:09, 7 June 2006 (UTC)

Fixed. Kmusser 15:13, 8 June 2006 (UTC)

WW2 History of the gulf and river[edit]

Maybe something about the Battle of the St. Lawrence could be added to the History section? Originalname37 (talk) 16:27, 11 June 2008 (UTC)

I added it.Originalname37 (talk) 16:54, 13 June 2008 (UTC)

Tuscarora?[edit]

I'm a bit confused why lots of articles (Schenectady, New York, Hudson River, Mohawk River), including this one, have the name of the place in the Tuscarora language. The Tuscarora are from North Carolina and did not come to New York or Canada until AFTER Europeans had already been there first (in the case of Canada and the Hudson River the Europeans were there a good 200+ years first). Tuscarora is not a good language to translate these places into. Might as well put the Irish translation or Basque, they may even have been to these places before the French and Dutch, there would therefore be a more legitimate reason for their inclusion. Iroquois or Algonquin languages that were in the area should be used. If no one else on any of these pages comes up with a really good reason to keep them, I'm going to do a systematic search of all places in the area and remove all mentioning of these places names in Tuscarora.Camelbinky (talk) 22:45, 9 January 2009 (UTC)

Drainage?[edit]

Isn't the St. Lawrence River the only river that goes from the Great Lakes to the Atlantic? -Supermonkey Jasonxu98 (talk) 00:19, 28 March 2009 (UTC)

Other than the navigation channels with numerous locks, indeed the St. Lawrence doesn't have any parallel waterbody. This prevails, whether in the Great Lakes region, or on its W-S-W to E-N-E way toward its gulf and the Atlantic. Of course, at times the river is split in smaller sections as it passes many archipelagoes, but none of the natural islands are long enough to separate the river for long streches. Francsois (talk) 00:29, 2 April 2009 (UTC)

Removal of misleading photo from this page![edit]

Image:Aerial photo 6 Saint Lawrence River.jpg

Under the sub-section Names, i have put this photo between HTML remark brackets <!->, since it is quite misleading.

Having lived in and around Montreal for about 4 decades, as well as having worked as a motorized courrier very knowledgeable of local maps, i know that the above image is NOT of St. Lawrence River. It's a photo of two parallel rivers to the north of Montreal Island, Rivière des Prairies and Rivière des Mille Îles, which are part of the Ottawa River delta into the St. Lawrence.

I have written to the user who has posted it, on their talk page (as they don't seem to provide any other means for contacting them), so to tell them know they should both change the descriptive text of the image, as well to suggest them to submit the image to the aforementioned geographic article pages, plus on Îles Laval, and Jesus Island, which is occupied by (Laval City).

The 4 above articles (see links) could clearly benefit from such a detailed aerial picture. Francsois (talk) 00:50, 2 April 2009 (UTC)

Is the Gulf of Saint Lawrence really the estuary for the Saint Lawrence.[edit]

The saltwater part starts slightly after Quebec City and increases salinity downstream and through the Gulf of Saint Lawrence. Or is the entire part from Ile Orleans to the Atlantic considered the Gulf of Saint Lawrence? —Preceding unsigned comment added by Sega31098 (talkcontribs) 04:58, 6 December 2009 (UTC)

How wide?[edit]

A statement that the St. Lawrence River is the widest river in the world should be accompanied by a figure. I could not find one in the article. I had always thought the Amazon River to be the widest. Caeruleancentaur (talk) 12:39, 10 August 2010 (UTC)

Depending on what is considered to be the mouth of the Amazon River, it is said to be anywhere from 202 miles to 9.3 miles in width. Determining where river ends and mouth/estuary/gulf begins is debatable in either case. Caeruleancentaur (talk) 12:50, 10 August 2010 (UTC)

Inclusion of the 1000 Islands Region[edit]

This article should also mention that the St. Lawrence contains the 1000 Islands region. — Preceding unsigned comment added by BuffaloFil (talkcontribs) 23:16, 26 December 2010 (UTC) harry potter!!!

tidal?[edit]

How far inland is it tidal? Also, it has a very curious, gradually opening mouth. Would love some more discussion of that. When I follow the link to Gulf of St. Lawrence, it is not about that widening mouth, but about further out.TCO (talk) 19:31, 20 March 2011 (UTC)

Just added info from a couple sources saying it becomes tidal around Quebec City. The first source, Rivers of North America, has a lot more info about the estuary/tidal portion of the river below Quebec City. A quick look through Google Books on the topic (this was my search paramters) gave the impression that particularly large tides can sometimes influence the river beyond Quebec City, and the mean tidal range at Quebec City is 4.1 meters, which is pretty big. Still, it seems common to cite Quebec City as about where the river turns tidal, so I wrote "in the vicinity of". Lots more info about the tides and estuary can be found in that Google Books search on the estuary portion.
I didn't see anything specifically about the gradually widening mouth. I'd guess it is due to geologic factors. The shape reminds me a bit of the Río de la Plata in South America. I also changed the claim of the St. Lawrence's estuary being the largest in the world to "one of the largest in the world". The Río de la Plata is sometimes said to be the largest estuary in the world as well as (sometimes said to be) the widest river. These things are impossible to say definitively since the "river" turns into "ocean" over a large estuary "zone". There's no way to objectively say where the river ends and the sea begins, although I'm sure there are sources out there that make the "largest" and "widest" claim for both the St. Lawrence and the Río de la Plata. Pfly (talk) 01:24, 21 March 2011 (UTC)
Great response, thanks.
Thanks. I just remembered reading in one of those Google Book sources something about a significant tidal bore occurring on the tidal part of the river. Could be worth adding such info with further research... Pfly (talk) 01:45, 21 March 2011 (UTC)

Discharge[edit]

The page currently says "The average discharge at the mouth is 9,850 m3/s (347,800 cu ft/s)." The source for this is The Atlas of Canada, a decent source but not, in my experience, as good as one might expect. The book Rivers of North America provides a number of discharge stats on page 990—all quite a bit larger than 9,850—up to 16,800 m3/s. Also, the Atlas of Canada's figure is not for the "mouth". The webpage says: "The discharge of a stream or river is derived from Canadian water level measurements at the furthest-downstream gauging station." Should we change the discharge figure to 16,800, with a location of "downstream of the Saguenay River? Or maybe there is better info out there. Pfly (talk) 01:35, 21 March 2011 (UTC)

Actually, I'll just make this change. Perhaps a better, more detailed source can be found though. Pfly (talk) 01:36, 21 March 2011 (UTC)

16,800? This would make the Saint Lawrence larger than the Mississippi. Surely, it's not this big? — Preceding unsigned comment added by Tatlayoko (talkcontribs) 20:36, 1 January 2013 (UTC)

One source says it's larger than the Mississippi and dozens of sources says it not. That Jump is incredible and really not believable. I looked up the statements in "Rivers of North America", but cannot verify thier sources. I will continue to use the figures from the "Atlas of Canada" and suggest that this page do the same. — Preceding unsigned comment added by Welkiner (talkcontribs) 04:59, 19 May 2015 (UTC)

Max outflow of Saint Lawrence[edit]

I was just thinking, it would be nice to know what the max discharge recorded for the river. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 50.92.94.137 (talk) 07:45, 14 July 2012 (UTC)