Talk:Samuel Nunez

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Talk: Samuel Nunez


Samuel Rabirio Nunez, a Portuguese Sephardic Jew, is the topic of a 1961 article by Dr. Alfred A. Weinstein, Harvard Medical Alumni Bulletin, at http://underthemagnoliatree.net/Samuel_Nunez.html/.

According to the article:

The family was imprisoned as part of the Inquisition, but Dr. Nunez saved the family by treating the Inquisitor's ailing prostate.

He was allowed to continue his medical practice, and was prominent in the Lisbon and diplomatic community there. They escaped by joining up by prearrangement with a British brigantine to settle in Georgia. The English were sending ships of settlers there. The escape, in 1733, took place while accompanied by the Inquisitor's spies, who lived with the family to see they did not relapse into heresy; his wife, Rebecca, daughter Zipporah, an aunt, Abigail de Lyon who died later in Georgia with rope marks from the torture still showing on her wrists, and ostensibly all settled in Georgia.

Once there, Dr. Nunez treated the "bloody flux" and "malignant fevers" with local botanicals, including sassafras root tea to purify the blood, and his earlier knowledge.

Another Jew who was on that first voyage, Abraham de Lyon, was a farmer and prominent vintner, set up a substantial garden to grow medicinal plants, and assisted Dr. Nunez.

Samuel and Rebecca Nunez had two sons when in Georgia, Daniel and Moses; and another daughter, Esther.

When the Spanish appeared ready to invade the English settlements, Nunez fled with his family and his servant, Shem Noah, to Charleston, returning to Savannah, Georgia, several years later. The Nunez family descendants continued in prominence in Georgia and elsewhere, as the article notes.

The author, Dr. Weinstein, shows no connection to the Nunez family.

Relate this Samual Nunez topic to a history of the settlements of Georgia and the coastal islands there.

See reference for a Jewish settlement the book online. from 1930, "Our Todays and Yesterdays," a story of Brunswick and the Coastal Islands, by Margaret Davis Cate, at http://www.glynngen.com/mdc/oty/page1.htm/ See page 151/ A "Jewtown" is listed there, in a section about St. Simons island, at the town of Hamilton. There, two Jewish brothers named Levison had started a sawmill.

The French came to the coastal area first, then the Spanish under Menendez de Avillez claimed it all for Spain in about 1585, and occupied Georgia's coast. The English set up some early competing settlements, ultimately occupying the entire area for England after about 1684. The Bibliography includes a book, "Spanish Days in Glynn County" (Brunswick)by a Mary Ross.

Cormorant (talk) 11:32, 10 July 2009 (UTC)