Talk:Shinto

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"Yamatokotoba" and "kami no michi"[edit]

The article states the opposite, however; these two terms are of different meaning! "Yamatokotoba" refers to words native to Japan (as opposed to words derived from China etc.). "Kami no michi", 神の道, is equal to the term Shintou, 神道, in meaning (the way of the gods), but different in that it is the native Japanese reading, in other words the "yamatokotoba version" of the term. "Shintou" is the adapted Chinese-like reading of the two Chinese characters meaning "god" and "way" (both abstract and actual ones).

Edit request[edit]

Hello I wrote this sentence from japan,
If possibole as Editing belows sentence.

I'll Adding it,Next paragraph of Koukogaku,Historysections.

+ + + +

I stop My requests.
Because Urashimataro-san made it a nice section of Shinbutsu shūgō and the jingūji and Shinbutsu bunri in Shinto shrine.

I think That sections is copying or summary to "Shinto"'s Subjects better.

I knew My English is Gloomy...(Infact it's used B-ing translater...) ;-p
I would some one Makes nice sections...so He made it!
Thank you Very much! Urasimataro-san.

I Confused,"Shinto" and "Shinto shrine"....

Arigato, from .jp

Suggestion[edit]

I suggest removing the "citation needed" tag from the basic claim in the "Cultural heritage" section. Speling12345 (talk) 7:04, 17 December 2013 (UTC)

Picture of shinto priest and priestess (??)[edit]

The description for the picture reads "Seen at a ritual at Yasaka shrine, when elderly people, dressed as Shinto priests, chanted songs, whilst younger priestesses performed a very slow dance Kagura." So, it seems even the picture says they are people 'dressed as priests' and not real priests. However, I'm pretty sure these are not the clothes traditionally worn by shinto priests. I'm pretty sure these people are just musicians/singers from some troupe, invited by Yasaka Jinja to perform. Anyone that agrees/disagrees/knows more about it? Geertrinkel (talk) 16:29, 26 January 2017 (UTC)

It does appear to be unreliable, so I've removed it. Thanks for pointing it out Geertrinkel. AtHomeIn神戸 (talk) 00:03, 27 January 2017 (UTC)

General[edit]

This can just be a general section for anything else.76.5.150.106 (talk) 21:40, 29 March 2017 (UTC) Oh by the way, anyone know the name of that symbol that looks like a flaming drop of water?76.5.150.106 (talk) 21:41, 29 March 2017 (UTC)

External links modified[edit]

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Symbol of Shinto[edit]

Hidari mitsudomoe.svg

I think that the symbol that best represents Shinto is the threefold tomoe, not the torii. The tomoe figures in many Japanese shrines and it is also used by the Tsubaki Grand Shrine of America. Someone should make a red threefold tomoe and add it to the template. Though the article "tomoe" is in a bad state, it says "Some view the mitsudomoe as representative of the threefold division (Man, Earth, and Sky) at the heart of the Shinto religion". This is the same trinity that is found in Chinese religion and Korean shamanism (represented by a threefold taegeuk in the latter).--87.2.113.191 (talk) 12:35, 30 July 2017 (UTC)

Hinduism[edit]

YEEEEEEKKK — Preceding unsigned comment added by 2606:6000:5010:5800:F504:B47E:FD8F:2109 (talk) 21:38, 29 August 2017 (UTC)

Welcome my fellow minions[edit]

Know try to read this jefjdsncEWF;WJEBGUEjJFJDnfGbfbarjnbnvbvfhfhfmckjnc;sk"wKE' KRWBFAVNc4d68c456D1 All of you guy got it wrong

Symbol of Shinto[edit]

I think that the symbol that best represents Shinto is the threefold tomoe, not the torii. The tomoe figures in many Japanese shrines and it is also used by the Tsubaki Grand Shrine of America. Someone should make a red threefold tomoe and add it to the template. Though the article "tomoe" is in a bad state, it says "Some view the mitsudomoe as representative of the threefold division (Man, Earth, and Sky) at the heart of the Shinto religion". This is the same trinity that is found in Chinese religion and Korean shamanism (represented by a threefold taegeuk in the latter).--87.2.113.191 (talk) 12:35, 30 July 2017 (UTC)

Symbol of Shinto[edit]

think that the symbol that best represents Shinto is the threefold tomoe, not the torii. The tomoe figures in many Japanese shrines and it is also used by the Tsubaki Grand Shrine of America. Someone should make a red threefold tomoe and add it to the template. Though the article "tomoe" is in a bad state, it says "Some view the mitsudomoe as representative of the threefold division (Man, Earth, and Sky) at the heart of the Shinto religion". This is the same trinity that is found in Chinese religion and Korean shamanism (represented by a threefold taegeuk in the latter).--87.2.113.191 (talk) 12:35, 30 July 2017 (UTC)  — Preceding unsigned comment added by 2606:6000:5010:5800:F504:B47E:FD8F:2109 (talk)