Talk:Shout band

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Shout band on 2008 Grammy Awards[edit]

Who were the shout band on the 2008 Grammy Awards (February 10, 2008)? Badagnani (talk) 02:48, 11 February 2008 (UTC)

My apologies for taking so long to respond. That was, at the time, The Madison Bumblebees of Winnsboro, South Carolina. They were lead by Brother Hank Bilal, a good friend of mine. He was accompanied by Eld. Babbs. (Machpovii3...Holla Atcha Bezzle, Kid! 07:51, 25 December 2008 (UTC)) —Preceding unsigned comment added by Machpovii3 (talkcontribs)

We should add this to the article. You don't mean Edward Babb, do you? Badagnani (talk) 08:11, 25 December 2008 (UTC)

To be honest, we need to be careful who gets added to this. Guidelines are harsh and strict about what information about the HOP can be published. As long as it strictly educational and informative and completly unbiased and not offending or making any kind of accusatinos and only telling the truth, it should be fine.(Machpovii3...Holla Atcha Bezzle, Kid! 08:29, 25 December 2008 (UTC)) —Preceding unsigned comment added by Machpovii3 (talkcontribs)

You mean the United House of Prayer For All People? We have an article about it. It was founded in Massachusetts, yet this article states that the music is from North Carolina. Why is that? And are you saying that if I'm ever in New York City I wouldn't welcome to visit a service at the church on 125th Street to hear Edward Babb's band? I was hoping to do that one day. Badagnani (talk) 08:34, 25 December 2008 (UTC)

I'm saying none of the above. Truth is that the musical part was started in the south. Remember that during the whole depression and prohibition era, jazz was very prominent. The north had individuals that played but the south had full out bands. If you go to any United House of Prayer you'd be very welcomed! But just like with any organization or anything that is established to help people, there are people who would are willing to do whatever they can to discredit us. They will even go so far as to take facts and misconscrue them so that it casts us in a bad light. Which is why we have to be careful about what is put on the internet and in the public eye. Now if people want to come themselves and see it first hand, they can come, bring the family, friends and entire state to do so. (Machpovii3...Holla Atcha Bezzle, Kid! 09:13, 25 December 2008 (UTC))

OK, thank you. The south-to-north idea makes sense, and I have a book on how black musicians picked up old Civil War-era brass instruments in pawn shops in the decades after the war, and how brass instruments became very popular, particularly in New Orleans. Badagnani (talk) 09:16, 25 December 2008 (UTC)

I have to add that the performance of Edward Babb's band in 1997 at the NEA Heritage Awards ceremony and concert, which I've seen on video, was one of the most amazing things I've ever seen in my life. I also like the "sacred steel" of the House of God, another African American congregation. Badagnani (talk) 09:18, 25 December 2008 (UTC)

That sounds good to me. (69.132.178.191 (talk) 13:18, 25 December 2008 (UTC))

Just to make sure this is clear and history is recorded correctly, "shout-band" music as played by the House of Prayer did not come from any secular music nor was it copied from any other. Many people confused it with Jazz bands, etc. The only similarity is the use of trombones/bass/drums. It is Bishop Grace and only he that started and established this type of music back in the 1920s. The "shout-band" concept in the earlier years was not formulated as it is today with just trombones/bass/and drums. There is a recording done by RCA of a UHOP shout band from the Charlotte House of Prayer in 1936 that had NO TROMBONES. But whether one uses the trombone or washboard, guitar, and piano, the concept of the "shout-band" is still the same. Get the CD(Saint's Paradise) and listen to the Madison Prayer Band. As years went by, "shout-band" music has become more established and well known. It is through this music that many of the rhythm and blues and jazz instrumentalists of contemporary music have been influenced. Smithsonian Folkways did a excellent piece on the Trombone Shout Bands in the HOP. It was only Bishop Grace that brought this type of music to America. At least i can't find any thing of a of shout-band concept before the 1920s.--Manfree (talk) 18:06, 31 December 2008 (UTC)
In addition to this, there is an understanding to the current use of trombones as the primary instrument being used. Trombones, unlike any other instrument, come the closest to being able to mimic the human voice as so to play a song as closely as to the way the original singer would have done it. Though, it ha since been removed to perform a ong the exact way as the artist who originally sung whatever selection, it is still used, in the more advanced cases, to envoke the feeling of singing a song thereby instantly getting crowds more involved on a personal level. (69.132.178.191 (talk) 08:27, 25 January 2009 (UTC))

Where may that piece be found? Badagnani (talk) 19:08, 31 December 2008 (UTC) --RESPONSE: Buy the Saints Paradise CD. The liner gives a history of how this music started. Also, you are not going to find any type of music like this except from the UHOP. They originated this type of style/music and now it is being copied by others, but as with every thing the original when played with the right spirit has a distinct sound like no other. Hearing it on CD is good, but seeing it live in action at a church service is where it shows. Here is the URL(Amazon):http://www.amazon.com/Saints-Paradise-Trombone-Shout-Bands/dp/B00000JKGN/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=music&qid=1230757302&sr=8-1 —Preceding unsigned comment added by Manfree (talkcontribs) 21:06, 31 December 2008 (UTC)

Recitative[edit]

The article refers to "recitive". Shouldn't that be recitative? Unfree (talk) 02:31, 30 November 2009 (UTC)

General and Basic Information[edit]

This article needs to remain basic as far as concept and should only go into intricate detail where musical understanding is concerned. If anything needs to be cleaned up, so be it. (Machpovii3...Holla Atcha Bezzle, Kid! 13:23, 29 June 2012 (UTC)) — Preceding unsigned comment added by Machpovii3 (talkcontribs)