Talk:Silicon-germanium

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No, SiGe on insulator is different from the compound semiconductor SiGe

...Also SiGe has applications to strained silicon in (very) modern CMOS, independent of SOI. (Karlleeser 07:30, 30 January 2006 (UTC))

Elemental/compound names should be spelled out in headers/titles so that they can be grabbed properly for links elsewhere (Karlleeser 07:32, 30 January 2006 (UTC))

Yeah, this merge suggestion didn't make much sense. If anything, SiGeOI would be merged into SiGe, though I'm not advocating that. I pulled the banner, hope no one minds too much. --Jschultz 03:17, 28 October 2006 (UTC)

Bernard Meyerson[edit]

Mention should be made of IBM's Bernard Meyerson who in many respects made SiGe what it is today.

See:

http://domino.watson.ibm.com/comm/pr.nsf/pages/bio.meyerson.html

BTW I consider SiGe to be an alloy not a compound semiconductor.

Royzee (talk) 12:18, 4 March 2008 (UTC)

Bernard Meyerson made contributions to ultra high vacuum chemical vapor deposition (UHVCVD) of SiGe. This technique is not in use anywhere except at IBM (if there?). John Bean and Roosevelt People at AT&T Bell Labs predicted and measured the bandgap of the strained alloy more than 10 years earlier than the article you reference. If anybody should be mentioned, it should be them. —Preceding unsigned comment added by Solidstate100 (talkcontribs) 23:54, 28 February 2010 (UTC)

Use as thermoelectric material in GPHS-RTG[edit]

Should it be mentioned in this article ? - Rod57 (talk) 02:41, 21 October 2012 (UTC)