Talk:Slang terms for money

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Australia[edit]

The bills section appears to be entirely bullshit. I've lived in Australia my whole life and NO-ONE uses any of those stupid terms. Maybe 30years ago when there were no cheques or Cards, but not in the last few decades.

  • I agree that the bills section is bullshit - Never heard a single one of them. Someone should either cough up the citations or delete this crap. Trideceth12 (talk) 02:45, 1 April 2016 (UTC)

These are just some of the Aussie slang terms for pre-decimal (pre-1966)coinage.

Threepence: tray or trey bit or trey, comes from the french tre meaning three.

Sixpence: zac or tanner.

Shilling: bob or deener or dina.

Florin: two bob or sly.

U.S. coinage[edit]

Dime is not a slang term for the coin itself, but has entered urban slang for someone of unusual beauty. The U.S. 10¢ piece has had the words "ONE DIME" since 1837. It is derived from the Latin term for one-tenth.Bill S. (talk) 15:29, 9 December 2010 (UTC)

Bread[edit]

I thought this came from rhyming slang - "bread and honey". Opera hat (talk) 11:58, 3 September 2011 (UTC)

Bob[edit]

in some parts of the country, "bob" continues to represent one-twentieth of a pound, that is five new pence, and two bob is 10p

Fascinating. I didn't think "bob" had survived decimalisation. Do we know where these expressions are used? (Re: Still used in Sheffield, England for example) BTW, half-crown survived crown, because the latter was more recently not in general circulation. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 80.189.103.145 (talk) 16:54, 23 March 2013 (UTC)