Talk:Slavic dragon

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Untitled[edit]

In Russia he is called as Zmey Gorinich, has three heads, is green, walks on two back paws, has small front paws, and spits fire.

Yes, and Zmey in Russian means Snake, not Dragon.

In Bulgarian smok("смок") is kind of snake. I think its name comes from smucha("смуча") which means "to suck". To tell that somebody is a "smok" means that he drinks(swallows) too much. So smok is not unique.

"Змея" (Zmeya) in Russian means Snake indeed, but "Змей" (Zmey, masculine form of a word "Змея") in russian fairy tales allways means dragon-like creature: it can fly, it has many heads, it spits fire. Енин Арсений (talk) 18:29, 28 November 2012 (UTC)

Zilant[edit]

Hm, I think it's not correct to compare Tugarin Zmievich with Zilant. The first is a Slavic dragon named after Turks, the second is a Turkic dragon, and his Russian name is only a rendering of Tatar word 'Snake. In fact, Zilant is presented not in the culture of Russians, but in the culture of multinational people of Tatarstan, and can't be related to a Slavic dragon. especially it could't symbolize Turkic peoles, becose he probably symbolized Russians! :)--Untifler 15:56, 7 April 2006 (UTC)

The article on Zilant says that the dragon is a manifestation of a benevolent Turkic spirit (White Snake). That would be more believable, since the serpent motif is frequently seen among Turkic and Islamic nations. While in Russian mythology dragons and serpents are almost never positive, various Turkic nations extensively used serpents as their national and tribal symbol. --194.72.81.141 (talk) 13:13, 24 October 2008 (UTC)

In russian zmeja means snake, but zmei (male for of female zmeja) means dargon. Nice image of Zmei Gorynych (more clearly seen dragon, than image on page): http://img105.imageshack.us/img105/872/dragonudopm3.gif

Zmaj and azdaja[edit]

The description of the creature corresponds to azdaja, animal like being like lizard. Zmaj is human-like being which communicates with people and steals young girls according to Serbian mythology, and their children with those girls are heros. Zmajs were considered great lovers. When Zmajs are landing and arriving somewhere they are accompanied with flames, thunders and strong winds. It is intersting to note that in Old Testemony similar creatures are mentioned that are called sons of God. In the Bible they land on Earth and took human daughters as wifes and had children with them that were heros.

Remark: You should put the link to Milos Obilic here - he was the knight of the dragon order, it is a XIV century story, there is a literature/legends about the origin of Milos, as well as the artistic work. Moreover, it is on wikipedia, as well. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Milos_Obilic

More accurately, zmaj is a dragon and is sometimes believed capable of taking human form, while not being a humanoid itself. Azdaha (archaic term) or azdaja (modern term) is of the same nature as dragon, but is a monster and a dreadful beast. While dragons in Western mythology are sometimes benevolent and sometimes malevolent, in Serbian mythology there is a division between zmaj (benevolent and highly intelligent dragon) and azdaja (malevolent dragon-like monster). Zmaj is always highly intelligent, has superhuman strength, is proficient in magic, is very old and has enormous knowledge, is very rich and possesses unimaginable amounts of gold and other precious things. It is also described as lustful for human women and capable of having offspring with them, and sometimes capable of taking human form. There were many legends about many great historical and/or mythical heroes that they were conceived by a dragon. On the other hand, the beast on St. George icon is an azdaja, and not a dragon. In Serbian, it is called 'St. George slays the azdaja', while English term 'dragon' is almost always translated as 'zmaj'.79.101.236.151 (talk) 02:24, 12 July 2009 (UTC)

Three Heads?[edit]

In some fairytales, slavic dragons have not only three, but also six and nine heads. In one such tale, a hero must kill all three. On the first night that the hero stands guard, the three-headed one comes out. On the second night, the six-headed one comes out. On the third night, the nine-headed one comes out. Sometimes, if all heads aren't sliced off at the same time, they grow again or can be put back on. The heads usually come in multiples of three. The Russian version of this article is quite usefull and more detailed on the subject of heads. —The preceding unsigned comment was added by Ladywater (talkcontribs) 07:42, 1 January 2007 (UTC).

Left-out information[edit]

"A dragon is called zmey in Russian and Bulgarian,"

Actually, a dragon can also be called "drakon" in Russian (дракон). See: ru:Дракон. "Zmey" is an older word, and isn't used as frequently anymore. I think in English, "Snake" or "serpent" can also mean "dragon". Esn (talk) 21:10, 10 April 2008 (UTC)

Traditionally, there is a difference between a Hydra and a Dragon, not to mention, Wyrm, which is often used for Dragon. The article references a variant of the Lernaean Hydra, A classical Dragon, and a 'dragon-like creature, which appears to be a hydra of another sort. Dragons have, of late become a much discussed topic in Fantasy Literature, and much can be read concerning them. It's important to distinguish between the information gleaned from modern sources, and the mythic data from centuries past.[1] 2605:6000:5741:D400:CD35:8D7B:E794:F68F (talk) 16:00, 23 October 2016 (UTC)

Slovene Pozoj (arhaic of "Zmaj")[edit]

My grandmother was scaring the shit out of me with word "POZOJ is going to get you if you will not be good " - when i was still a child. I remember i was scared to death - but i never knew what the word in fact represented. Later i've figured out that she was talking about "Zmaj" or "dragon"... It is indeed an unknown origin of the word - but the word has big effect deeply on children psychology...

Indeed Pozoj is a "Slovene" (Prekmurian) word. It is used also in several places in North-eastern Croatia (Međimurje, Zagorje) and among Hungarian Slovenes in Porabje. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 109.182.165.168 (talk) 23:01, 9 January 2014 (UTC)