Talk:Software rendering

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WikiProject Computer graphics (Rated Start-class)
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Article needs clarification and focus[edit]

This article drifts between talking about software rendering and hardware rendering, making contradictory statements that:

1) Software rendering is unaided by a graphics card, or specialized hardware.

2) That video game consoles use software rendering, and custom hardware.

3) That "Because there are still PC systems being sold with limited graphics cards (or none at all), software rendering will always be required for some applications." (This implies that software rendering co-exists with graphics card rendering.)

The article needs to start by explaining the concept of "software rendering" vs. "hardware rendering", and go from there to explain that most systems are some combination of the two.

Also, the peacock language particularly gets in the way in this article -- the concept is difficult enough in itself to nail down without introducing vague and debatable phrases such as "death of software rendering", "really popularized 3D gaming", and "games for kids and casual gamers".

Sentences such as this need to be more carefully thought out: "Because of the need for very high-quality and diversity of effects, offline rendering requires a lot of flexibility." This implies that somehow "very high-quality" requires some sort of unstated "flexibility". But more particularly it suggests that the needs for "high quality" and "diversity" affect offline rendering, but not "online", "real-time" rendering -- which is not the case.

Alpha Ralpha Boulevard (talk) 13:25, 30 June 2008 (UTC)


"This was the first time that 3D produced a compelling mainstream experience rather than being a specialist gimmick"

So the claim is, until the playstation, hardware 3D on the PC platform was a "Specialist Gimmick"?

Steven736 (talk) 19:04, 24 October 2008 (UTC)

becoming link spam[edit]

The following have been removed from the article. They were becoming link spam, and people should refer to Wikipedia:External links and only them back judiciously. — billinghurst sDrewth 03:22, 29 March 2013 (UTC)


External links[edit]

* Burning's Software Renderer contributed by Thomas Alten to the open source Irrlicht graphics engine.
* Coco3D a portable template-based software renderer for PCs and windows Mobile devices.
* Gens2 3D a software-only 3D engine for Win32 platform using DirectX.
* HyperMove  a rendering workflow software.
* Hypershot  a photorealistic realtime rendering software.
* KeyShot a photorealistic realtime rendering software.
* Kribi 3D Engine, a self-contained 3D engine featuring an incredibly fast pure software renderer.
* Muli3D, an open-source platform-independent software renderer, aimed at education and research.
* OpenRT Real-time Raytracing, a project aimed at developing a raytracing standard for interactive 3D graphics.
* Perspective Texture Mapping, series by Chris Hecker about rasterization and texture mapping fundamentals.
* Pixomatic, a high-performance software renderer by Michael Abrash and Mike Sartain with Direct3D 7-class features; supports games like Unreal Tournament 2004 and Medal of Honor.
* Renderer 2.0, an open-source (GPL) software renderer with per-pixel Phong shading, Z-Buffer, shadow mapping and ambient occlusion. Uses autoconf/automake and libSDL, and thus compiles and runs under Linux,Windows/MinGW,FreeBSD and MacOSX. It is written in C++, and uses OpenMP or Intel TBB to take advantage of multi-core machines.
* RenderMan, a rendering software system for high quality, photorealistic image synthesis
* SwiftShader, a highly advanced multi-platform software renderer with Shader Model 3.0 level features.
* swShader was the open source precursor of SwiftShader. Most recent version before it was removed from http://sourceforge.net/projects/sw-shader is available here.
* Trenki's Software Renderer/Rasterizer, a small open-source platform-independent software renderer implementation with fixed point math, supports vertex and pixel shaders written in C++.
* Vigilante Software Graphics a modern software renderer still under development.
* Multithreaded Software Rasterizer, a multithreaded open source rasterizer optimized with SSE.
* YETI3D  (OFFICIAL ENGINE by Derek John Evans)  A powerfull engine on software render with tools
* YETI3D++ (improved engine)  A powerfull engine on software render with tools\</per>