Talk:Solanum quitoense

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WikiProject Food and drink Tagging[edit]

This article talk page was automatically added with {{WikiProject Food and drink}} banner as it falls under Category:Food or one of its subcategories. If you find this addition an error, Kindly undo the changes and update the inappropriate categories if needed. The bot was instructed to tagg these articles upon consenus from WikiProject Food and drink. You can find the related request for tagging here . If you have concerns , please inform on the project talk page -- TinucherianBot (talk) 11:23, 3 July 2008 (UTC)

--- it grows in Central America too. In Costa Rica it is also called Naranjilla and it is widely used to make juices (refrescos). —Preceding unsigned comment added by 58.9.201.85 (talk) 11:57, 8 January 2010 (UTC)

Picked when ripe?[edit]

The introduction says that it's picked when ripe so it doesn't go sour, but further down (under pests & diseases now) we say that it's often picked unripe so that it doesn't go rotten. Can someone who really knows about these things clear it up? Thomas Kluyver (talk) 13:07, 8 January 2010 (UTC)

Subject Sour.[edit]

The fruit can be picked early to avoid a sour taste. The sentence was ambiguous.Cozzycovers (talk) 17:45, 26 January 2010 (UTC)

Thanks, but I still think the article contradicts itself a bit. In the introduction "The naranjilla fruit is harvested when fully ripe to avoid the fruit becoming sour." (I think we should leave about the 'as in taste', incidentally). Later: "Its fruit, like tomatoes, is impractical to pick ripe because of its short shelf life (4-5 days)". Looking at source 2 [1], that mentions both that the fruit sweetens when ripe, and that it is often picked green to protect it (it quotes a shelf-life of 6-8 days). I'm going to go ahead and make the necessary changes. Thomas Kluyver (talk) 18:39, 26 January 2010 (UTC)

....[edit]

That was it was just a quick fix until I got home. But your right those two sentences still did sound contradictory. Basically If you want to the fruit to taste sweeter you pick it when it's rip and if you don't want it to rot (like if your selling) you pick it when its less ripe.Cozzycovers (talk) 19:34, 26 January 2010 (UTC)

Fruits[edit]

  • The naranjilla fruit is harvested when fully ripe to avoid the fruit becoming sour. I agree change it.
  • Its fruit, like a tomatoes, is impractical to pick ripe because of its short shelf life (4-5 days) I agree change it. My Bad.
  • the fruit sweetens when ripe, and that it is often picked green to protect it (it quotes a shelf-life of 6-8 days) Your right the source did say 6-8 days. I dont know if I was thinking another fruits shelf-life or what, but our article needs to specify when they said often. I would put something that told everyone that they are picked both ways, because much the people who eat the fruit didn't get it commercially. When I visited costa rica I traveled through the rain forest with a rural farmer. I helped pick the fruits with him. He told me not to pick the green fruits which were physiologically mature, (you can see in the photo I took) and that I should pick the ripe ones. In that village they don't pick the fruits green. Also I told him I intended to take the fruit back to the village to share with another farmer as a thanks for letting me stay with him. It was about a 2 or 3 day hike after that to get to the village. The green fruits are actually not necessarily sour. The one in the photo was not. They have a bland taste thats not sweet, (with my experience) I ate 2 of green fruits. They started to turn sour, when they started turning orange. I picked some, like 3 or four orange fruits right off the plant. I ate a few all of which were all sour, and I stored the rest to eat in the village. When I got to the village, the fruits were still just as sour. They never sweetened. I wouldn't put that it sweetens in 6-8 days, because the fruit doesn't turn from sour to sweet as much as tasteless to sour. The fruit is not that sweet, that's why people put salt on it and or add sugar to the green drink they make. I'v only finished bio 1 and 2, I'm no scientists yet, and I don't have and published sources to confirm my statements, so I would understand if you just want to put what the sources said. The farmers I meet would love to tell you about Naranjilla plants and how they use it. I can give you information on how to contact them if you would like?Cozzycovers (talk) 21:39, 26 January 2010 (UTC)
Thanks, it's interesting to hear about some real experience of the plant! I agree that we should clarify the differences between commercial and local cultivation, and perhaps give more details of the flavour. Your experience can guide you when you're writing, but any specific claims ought to be referenced. So please do improve the article (I'm not possessive of it), bearing in mind that one of our sources says "Even though the fruit is sometimes consumed and processed at earlier stages of maturity (due to the pulp’s attractive greenish color), total soluble solids increase with maturity, which results in a sweeter pulp at later stages" and "The flavor of naranjilla has been described as sweet, similar to a mixture of banana, pineapple, and strawberry". Although it does also admit that the drink is made with sugar, so I guess the fruit can't be all that sweet. The other only describes the drink, which it calls "tart yet sweet". Thomas Kluyver (talk) 16:02, 28 January 2010 (UTC)