Talk:Sorrel

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
WikiProject Plants (Rated Start-class, Mid-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Plants, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of plants and botany on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
Start-Class article Start  This article has been rated as Start-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Mid  This article has been rated as Mid-importance on the project's importance scale.
 
WikiProject Food and drink / Herbs and Spices (Rated Start-class, Mid-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Food and drink, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of food and drink related articles on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
Start-Class article Start  This article has been rated as Start-Class on the project's quality scale.
Checklist icon
 Mid  This article has been rated as Mid-importance on the project's importance scale.
 

Untitled[edit]

Rumex Acetosa (possibly all varieties), or Rumex acetosella (Red Sorrel) is probably used in the Romanian soup Lobodă (Lobodă itself appears to be Atriplex hortensis). In Romanian, this Common Sorrel is called Stevie. In Indic languages, R. acetosella (Red Sorrel) may be called Gongura. I would appreciate if someone were to clear my confusion. njaard (talk) 18:34, 13 September 2010 (UTC)

It is rather late, but I would like to clarify the Romanian terminology: In Romanian, we do _not_ treat the Măcriș (Rumex acetosa) and Ștevie (Rumex patientia), and certainly not the Lobodă (Atriplex hortensis) as synonyms. The Ștevie is the currently better-known and more widely used, with the măcriș falling for a while into disuse, though it used to be quite a popular plant (there were popular sayings and songs referring to it dating back to about the 18-19th centuries.)
The măcriș and ștevie look rather similar and are sometimes confused by people who harvest them, but the texture and taste are different (the măcriș is more sour, is consumed when the leaves are smaller and crispier; the ștevie is more herb-like/grass-tasting and has longer leaves), and the uses are rather different too. Red sorrel is still considered 'măcriș'. The Rumex acetosa (măcriș) is most commonly used as salad/soup; the Rumex patientia (ștevie) is most commonly stewed, possibly with lemon or sourcream to enhance the taste, and the larger leaves may also be used to make a lighter version of the traditional sarmale (stuffed with seasoned meat and rice), seldom in soup; finally, the lobodă (red and green, commonly the red one is preferred) is not a Rumex, it is a very aromatic plant used almost exclusively in soups (seldom in salads). Kamasarye. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 95.76.146.15 (talk) 19:11, 12 August 2015 (UTC)

Assessment comment[edit]

The comment(s) below were originally left at Talk:Sorrel/Comments, and are posted here for posterity. Following several discussions in past years, these subpages are now deprecated. The comments may be irrelevant or outdated; if so, please feel free to remove this section.

in this page on Sorrel, its sour taste is attributed to the presence of ascorbic acid.

On the page about Sorrel Soup, the reason is given as the presence of oxalic acid.

Clarification is needed.

FleetingJoy (talk) 15:02, 17 September 2009 (UTC)

Last edited at 15:02, 17 September 2009 (UTC). Substituted at 06:33, 30 April 2016 (UTC)

Nigerian sorrel[edit]

Nigerian sorrel used to make Zobo is actually an Hibiscus. It is probable that the other Nigerian food preparations included in text are also made from Hibiscus and not Rumex acetosa. Someone with knowledge of African cuisine and botany should confirm this and edit text accordingly. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 142.167.120.72 (talk) 18:50, 1 August 2016 (UTC)

Wrong picture of Armenian aveluk - not sorrel[edit]

Look at a close-up of the picture. Especially the hollow or semi-hollow leaf stems, and the seemingly very smooth and elongated leaves. This is definitely not sorrel leaves, probably some kind of leek. VonPalm (talk) 17:15, 9 November 2016 (UTC)

I think you are right.Plantsurfer 23:11, 30 April 2017 (UTC)