Talk:South Polar dinosaurs

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
          This article is of interest to the following WikiProjects:
WikiProject Dinosaurs (Rated Start-class, Mid-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Dinosaurs, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of dinosaurs and dinosaur-related topics on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
Start-Class article Start  This article has been rated as Start-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Mid  This article has been rated as Mid-importance on the project's importance scale.
 
WikiProject Palaeontology (Rated Start-class, Mid-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Palaeontology, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of palaeontology-related topics and create a standardized, informative, comprehensive and easy-to-use resource on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
Start-Class article Start  This article has been rated as Start-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Mid  This article has been rated as Mid-importance on the project's importance scale.
 
WikiProject Australia (Rated Start-class, Mid-importance)
WikiProject icon South Polar dinosaurs is within the scope of WikiProject Australia, which aims to improve Wikipedia's coverage of Australia and Australia-related topics. If you would like to participate, visit the project page.
Start-Class article Start  This article has been rated as Start-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Mid  This article has been rated as Mid-importance on the project's importance scale.
 
Note icon
Need help improving this article? Ask a LibrarianWhat's this? at the National Library of Australia.
Note icon
The Wikimedia Australia chapter can be contacted via email to help@wikimedia.org.au for other than editorial assistance.
WikiProject Antarctica (Rated Start-class, Mid-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Antarctica, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of Antarctica on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
Start-Class article Start  This article has been rated as Start-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Mid  This article has been rated as Mid-importance on the project's importance scale.
 

Untitled[edit]

Am I right in thinking there was no polar ice cap during the Cretaceous? If so, this needs to be said in the article, to clarify the section on climate. The Singing Badger 15:49, 11 Nov 2004 (UTC)

I don't think there was, (the scope of this article is about Northern Antartica at the time), but as soon as I can confirm it one way or another I slap it in!Sabine 15:52, 11 Nov 2004 (UTC)

Indeed there was no icecap. There was a six-month night, however. --Wetman 15:54, 11 Nov 2004 (UTC)

Move page?[edit]

Should this article's title simply be Polar dinosaurs? It deals with dinosaurs found in both Australia and Antarctica and indeed it's not logical to treat the continents separately since they were joined together at the time. The Singing Badger 17:36, 11 Nov 2004 (UTC)

  • I think it's okay as is, South Polar Dinosaurs is kind of cumbersome and Polar Dinosaurs could also include the Polar Dinosaurs that migrated around Alaska. The juxtaposition of Polar and Australia makes it (which hopefully makes people think Australia and Anrarctica and not the Acrtic!). Sabine 18:29, 11 Nov 2004 (UTC)
    • OK... fair point about the North Pole :) ... but I'm now thinking that South Polar dinosaurs more accurately describes the contents of the article. Both titles seem equally cumbersome to me but one is a better description... thoughts? The Singing Badger 00:38, 12 Nov 2004 (UTC)
      • Early Cretaceous Gondwana? There is more in this than dinos (much as I loooove dinos). Sabine 00:56, 12 Nov 2004 (UTC)
        • Oh dear, it's starting to get very complicated! Let's wait and see if anyone else gives a toss... :) The Singing Badger 01:12, 12 Nov 2004 (UTC)
          • Nothing jumps out as radically better than the current title. I think it's a little better than South Polar Dinosaurs because it's more specific, and the juxtaposition of "polar" and "Australia" hints that the world was very different then. Michael Z. 04:07, 2004 Nov 12 (UTC)
  • There is an entry Cretaceous, which should have subsections "Laurasian fauna" and "Gondwana fauna" that discuss all the representative fauna of the Cretaceous continents, with a strong explicit link to this entry from "Gondwana fauna." This article is simply about Polar dinosaurs, and the briefest note in it might mention that there was no Cretaceous landmass at the north pole. --Wetman 16:56, 19 Nov 2004 (UTC)
    • Eek! This makes my head hurt. This is a rather specific entry, Early cretaceous Gondwana - which at the time was only Antartica and Australia....but Polar Dinosaurs could surely also cover Jurrasic polar dinosaurs, Alaska's dinosaurs, etc etc. I've just been reading about them but info is a little harder to come by so the article is a ways off... I know, if we change it to Polar Dinosaurs then we can add a bunch of stuff on Northern dinosaurs, I don't have as much but I could dig some up some time in the next two weeks. The article won't suffer for being expanded in scope. sunbird 00:11, 20 Nov 2004 (UTC)


The end product, "Polar Dinosaurs in Australia" has a syncopated lilt to it. (Was that their live tour album or their come-back album?) --Wetman 20:45, 16 Dec 2004 (UTC)

"This combination of a habitable terrain with a long polar night is an ecological circumstance that has no present day analogue." Actually some parts of the Norwegian arctic go close. There is some forest, and historically has been agriculture and animal herding there. However it declines into tundra before you get as close to the pole as Dinosaur Cove probably was. Spitzbergen is very high in the arctic and by some definitions barely habitable. It has tundra vegetation and a few large animals.

Endothermic dinosaurs[edit]

The ability of polar dinosaurs to survive a cold polar night makes it almost certain they were endothermic. I think it's worth of notion in the article. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 82.166.232.135 (talk) 01:51, 16 October 2007 (UTC)

  • Well it depends of the reference, and how cold did it did get, I have read the temperature was warmer than today's temp. Only paleoclimatologist can give a definate answer. Enlil Ninlil 04:17, 16 October 2007 (UTC)

Survival of mammoths vs dinosaurs[edit]

"Given that the dinosaurs and other fauna of Cretaceous were well adapted for living in long periods of dark and cold weather, it has been postulated that this community might have survived the Cretaceous-Tertiary extinction event which exterminated the non-avian dinosaurs .... 'Reports earlier this year that dwarf mammoths survived to early historical times, in islands off the coast of Siberia, give force to such speculation.' " -- I should think that this comparison is pretty shaky, given that mammoths were probably killed off by primates with pointy sticks, and dinosaurs (quite likely) by an asteroid impact. - You can run, but you sure can't hide. -- 201.53.7.16 (talk) 11:23, 26 September 2008 (UTC)