Talk:Soviet manned lunar programs

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Discussion[edit]

Under the "Korolev's Soyuz concept" section, there is a sentence that says, "Chelomei's project had the lead until 1964 when a change of Soviet leadership swung behind Stalin."

Stalin died in 1953. Is this statement a typo, or has someone tampered with the actual article?

209.124.55.236 12:33, 28 March 2007 (UTC)

It is corrected now. It is "swung behind Korolev". Ricnun 21:30, 28 March 2007 (UTC)

Article needs cleanup? Steady! I only just started writing it...

There were four failed launch, not two... 194.100.185.1 08:02, 6 Jun 2005 (UTC)

Given that, the following quote needs to be changed somewhat: "Four N1 launches were attempted but both were failures and the second destroyed the launch complex." --cfmdobbie

Complexity not weakness[edit]

The N1 was actually powerful enough to send men to the Moon, but with 30 small engines slapped together, it greatly magnified the complexity and risk of failure. That's why it blew up on the launchpad. LeoO3 03:10, 11 Jun 2005 (UTC)

Early Soviet Plans[edit]

There are records of papers in 1955 commissioning the N1 studies for a lunar landing after 1970 using Earth Orbit Rendevous. This should change the line about the Soviets not having serious plans before 1964.

N-1[edit]

"Four N-1 launches were attempted but all were failures, despite engineering improvements after each crash."

Possibly a American sabotage as not to Soviets reveal with a real moonlandings the the American hoax? —Preceding unsigned comment added by 85.156.138.236 (talk) 04:49, 20 December 2008 (UTC)

One can only hope that that unintelligible mess was an attempt at humor. Yikes! 209.244.31.35 (talk) 06:02, 30 June 2009 (UTC)

Why was it kept secret???[edit]

Just out of curiosity, why was this kept "heavily secret"? At least, why before they "lost" .. what's the point of a space race if not to inflame your population with a desire to compete?

The point, ultimately, was prestige (at least on a political level), little of which would be gained by finishing second in a two man race. Better (from the Soviet perspective) to hedge your bets by denying there was a race to the Moon unless you could be absolutely confident of success.172.190.13.225 (talk) 06:00, 22 June 2010 (UTC)
Do you remember the Cold War, or were you born afterwards? The Soviets kept everything secret. Nothing was announced until after it was successfully completed. 65.94.45.160 (talk) 10:44, 27 April 2011 (UTC)
The soviets weren't really interested in what their own people thought of them... That's what guns are for. It was what the rest of the world thought of them that mattered. Drewder (talk) 17:30, 23 March 2015 (UTC)

"LK-1" and "LK-700" spacecraft[edit]

May be not the best source (I'm short on time to search for other sources), but here and here a "LK-1" and "LK-700" spacecraft is described, which is basically a the predecessor of the VA spacecraft (or actually the VA spacecraft), designed by OKB-52, launched by a Proton. Don't know how this fits in here, but I haven't seen much descriptions or any images of LK-1 and LK-700 spacecraft here on wikipedia, only the countless Soyuz derivates designed by OKB-1.

Furthermore, there are images of an assembled VA based lunar spacecraft (LK-700?), so it was more than a "proposal" by Chelomey. --Tony Mach (talk) 17:19, 1 September 2012 (UTC)

Where can I find photographs?[edit]

Where can I find photographs, published studies and other material about the Soviet moon landings? Why is it kept in secrecy? — Preceding unsigned comment added by 109.182.84.238 (talk) 08:26, 24 February 2013 (UTC)

What landings? If you mean the Luna and Lunokhod landers, I suggest you start with the Wikipedia articles and follow the links/references. If you mean the manned program, there were no Russian manned landings! If they'd persevered they would have sorted the issues and made it, but the Kremlin decided it wasn't worth the expense to be second in the race to put a man on the moon, and publically always denied they were in the race at all! It was only after the collapse of the USSR that it was finally confirmed that the Russians were seriously in the race. The USSR, despite their successes, didn't even televise a launch until 1971. The equivalent would be asking to see pictures and details of the tests of the U2 and SR-71 prototypes or the Aurora (if it even exists!). Remember the N1 never had a successful launch, and the other equipment (Soyuz apart) was never used for the purpose for which it was designed. So there was no reason for the USSR to release pictures of a cancelled program. No doubt relatively few pictures were taken, and they would have been classified. Doubtless there is a lot more material in the Russian archives, but you'd have to go over and dig them out, and have time and permission to do so. Many of the people who were involved are now dead, and much of the material is likely buried or was shredded when the program was cancelled. There isn't some "conspiracy" it's just that there is likely not a lot of material, and it's hard to access. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 203.161.78.193 (talk) 06:29, 31 December 2013 (UTC)

Work still needed after requested copy edit[edit]

I spent an exhausting 20 minutes making a requested copy edit on part of the article.

Going to the French Wiki article that was apparently the source, I find much additional information, not all necessarily encyclopedic. Someone who is an enthusiast and fairly fluent in reading/translating French needs to pick up the ball, here.

This is an important part of human history. Had the Soviet launches succeeded, the United States might very well have responded by continuing the Apollo Program. Leptus Froggi (talk) 19:08, 13 June 2014 (UTC)

Graphics issues[edit]

The graphics such as Tmk-mavr.jpg are generated by 3D software rendering, decades after the fact, and without establishing accuracy. It's one thing for the Russian space agencies to produce and release an official rendering, it's another for a random, uncredited person such as Eberhard Marx to create a simplified and possibly significantly inaccurate image, as with MondraumLOK.jpg.

Obviously someone is trying to do Wikipedia a good turn, but my guess is any number of renderings could be done given the specifications. A misrepresentation here could have significant consequences, since inevitably when new lunar expeditions are planned, people will look at previous references such as Wikipedia. Leptus Froggi (talk) 19:55, 13 June 2014 (UTC)