Talk:Spanish Empire

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Too much British propaganda in the article[edit]

The reign of Charles V saw a decline in the presence of Spain in the North of Africa, even if Tunis and its port, La Goleta, were taken in 1535. One after the other, most of the Spanish possessions were lost: Peñón de Vélez de la Gomera (1522), Santa Cruz de Mar Pequeña (1524), Algiers (1529), Tripoli (1551), Bujia (1554), and La Goleta and Tunis (1569).
[...]
The Ottomans recovered soon. They reconquered Tunis in 1574, and they helped to restore an ally, Abu Marwan Abd al-Malik I Saadi, in the throne of Morocco, in 1576. The death of the Persian shah, Tahmasp I was an opportunity for the Ottoman sultan to intervene in that country, so, in 1580 was agreed a truce in the Mediterranean with Philip II. [104]

This is completely untrue. The Ottoman were basically Mediterranean pirates. And the battle of Lepanto wiped them all out. They never recovered since, because nowadays we associate muslims with camels, but not with war ships (ironic, but it's still true). In fact the Spanish ruled only after the battle of Lepanto over the hole Mediterranean sea, and not before as you write. And beside that they ruled over most of South America, that's when English piracy grew very popular. I'm not saying that queen Elisabeth was a pirate queen, but almost since Francis Drake was a pirate. I know that Britsmen hate Spain, but that's no reason for these inaccuracies in the English Wikipedia. Because after all it was the British who worked together with the Ottoman Empire in a guerilla war on sea against the Spanish kingdom. Still it was finally France who crushed Spain (yeah, that Louis XIII-guy who nobody seems to like nowadays...) and not the UK. --178.197.228.81 (talk) 23:56, 1 August 2014 (UTC)

No chronological order[edit]

And btw the chronological order of the article is completely rubbish, too. --178.197.228.81 (talk) 00:00, 2 August 2014 (UTC)

The articles is filled with intertextual rubbish as well! Simple footnotes referencing the relevant source would suffice. The article needs a major cleanup. Tresmegistus (talk) 21:34, 5 January 2015 (UTC)

New book.[edit]

World Without End: The Global Empire of Philip II. By Hugh Thomas

Here is an article: http://www.economist.com/news/books-and-arts/21606735-illuminating-defence-way-spain-expanded-its-reach-across-americas-border — Preceding unsigned comment added by 99.73.133.221 (talk) 00:10, 20 September 2014 (UTC)


The naval war of 1475-79 was really a colonial war[edit]

The title “Treaty of Alcáçovas and the first colonial war” is more correct and accurate than the previous “Early Portuguese-Spanish Conflicts over territory outside the Iberian Peninsula”. The naval war of 1475-79 was much more than a “conflict” and involved colonies, islands, the west African coast, Atlantic supremacy and the monopoly of gold and slaves (besides ivory and pepper). It was really a colonial war among modern European powers. The first one.

Alcáçovas -the treaty that finished this war- also represented the first sharing of the known world.

“Territory outside the Iberian Peninsula” is too vague.

As British historian Sir Peter Russel wrote: «putting on one side the skirmishes which regularly took place in the Canaries between castilians and Portuguese from 1425 onwards, this 1475-79 war was the earliest colonial war between European powers.» (cited in History in Africa, vol. 17, African Studies Association, 1990, p. 116). Also historian Herman L. Bennet, commenting the book of John William Blake: «…Europeans in West Africa, 1450-1560 … illustrate the nature and scope of Portuguese enterprise in West Africa, the abortive attempt of Castilians to create an empire there and…» (Africans in Colonial Mexico, 2005, p. 254). There can be no doubt about the purpose of the Catholic Kings to build an empire in Africa at the expense of the Portuguese: «After some preliminary skirmishing a regular war at sea broke out in 1475, when Isabella of Castile … ordered her subjects to wrest what they could of the spoils of Africa from their neighbours. The Portuguese emerged the winners in the murderous hostilities that ensued, and by the…» (John Ewbank M. White in Cortés and the downfall of the Aztec Empire, 1971, p. 39).

As for the colonial nature of the Treaty of Alcáçovas (which finished this war), see Peter Padfield: «Exploration stopped … as war broke out between Portugal and Castile, and the sporadic actions between Portuguese vessels and increasing number of Spanish intruders on the West African coast flared up into regular operations concerned with the seizure of bases in the Canaries [and in Ceuta, Morocco, as well as in the Cape Verde islands] and the control of the Guinea trade. The Portuguese proved more than a match for their opponents at sea, and after four years of savage fighting the Treaty of Alcaçovas, while allowing the Spanish their existing colonies in the Canaries, confirmed the Portuguese in the African monopoly … this was the first of a long series of European treaties concerned with colonies and trading spheres. » (Tide of Empires, 1481-1654, 1979, p. 26).

Hispanicultur (talk) 18:17, 25 October 2014 (UTC)


Personal Union[edit]

Habsburg Dynastic territories located in Holy Roman Empire were not part of the Spanish Empire. You confused the term of Personal union and Colony. --Kirglach (talk) 12:14, 20 February 2015 (UTC)