Talk:Special education

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Suggested addition to section 3.1.1 History of special schools[edit]

Please note historical terminology: persons with mental retardation are now known as persons with a developmental disability in North America, and an intellectual disability in other parts of the world.

The world’s first and most famous attempt at teaching a 'retarded child' — the “Wild Boy of Aveyron,” who was captured at the end of the 18th century and brought to the National Institute for the Deaf and Dumb in Paris — was by Jean Marc Gaspard Itard in France.[1] After five years of instruction “he proved that the ‘feeble mind’ could learn.”[2] Itard’s work was continued by Édouard Séguin, who used his “physiological method” paired with sensory and muscle training to teach reading, writing, and speech.[3] Thereafter, he established “a class for ten to twelve ‘idiots’” in Rue Faubourg Saint Martin near Paris.[4] Moving to the United States in 1850, Séguin was credited with defining and shaping the education of the persons with mental retardation in North America. Despite his efforts, however, “the treatment of the mentally retarded continued to receive staunch opposition from the public, who believed that the teaching and training of the retarded was rather uneventful.”[5] It was not until 1848 that the United States made provisions for the treatment of the ‘mentally retarded’ in specially constructed hospitals.[6] The state of Massachusetts, through legislative efforts, founded the Walter E. Fernald Developmental Center. Its primary purpose emphasized the idea of “habilitation of the retarded and stressed the teaching of useful skills”.[7] By the end of the 19th century, 15 states had similar facilities in operation. An analogous institution in Alberta, Canada the Provincial Training School for Mental Defectives in Red Deer, was not built until 1923.

" References

  • Amary, I.B., The rights of the mentally retarded-developmentally disabled to treatment and education, Springfield: Charles C. Thomas Publisher, 1980.
  • Verstraete, P., The taming of disability: Phrenology and bio-power on the road to the destruction of otherness in France (1800-60), History of Education, 2005, 34(2): 119–134.

Asordi (talk) 18:58, 15 October 2012 (UTC)

No, they aren't. Developmental disability encompasses many, many more conditions than just MR. I'm sure that many people with cerebral palsy, who have a developmental disability but do not have MR, find this equation of DD with MR to be quite offensive.
Mental retardation is the official term for that condition (IQ below 70, plus difficulty with everyday skills) used by the World Health Organization in their current classification system. Terms like ID are preferred by many parents, but the scientific and medical world is still using MR. WhatamIdoing (talk) 04:13, 6 November 2012 (UTC)
This seems very US-centric. "Mental retardation" is not used by professionals in the UK. Itsmejudith (talk) 12:33, 12 March 2013 (UTC)
It is used in the UK, because that's the term used by the World Health Organization in their ICD-10 coding system and also in the DSM-IV. Teachers probably don't (although I hope that they aren't so ignorant or sloppy as to use "developmental disability" as their euphemism; most teachers and parents use intellectually disabled these days), but the psychiatrists and psychologists who actually diagnose that condition definitely do use mental retardation as the authoritative term, in the UK and everywhere else in the world. WhatamIdoing (talk)
Can you find one recent UK source using it? Itsmejudith (talk) 07:38, 26 March 2013 (UTC)
Easily: PMID 22696388, from the University of Liverpool last year. PMID 23462627, from the University of Plymouth last month. It's not just scholarly journals, either: see ISBN 978-3805592802 out of Oxford in 2010. WhatamIdoing (talk) 17:30, 26 March 2013 (UTC)
UK government source saying it has been replaced in UK. http://www.dwp.gov.uk/publications/specialist-guides/medical-conditions/a-z-of-medical-conditions/learning-disability/. Itsmejudith (talk) 07:09, 27 March 2013 (UTC)
Sure, and there are some US laws that say "intellectual disability" is the official replacement for MR in the US government's educational and social services publications. That doesn't mean that the term isn't actually being used, and your source acknowledges that even the UK is still using it "in disease classifications (ICD 10 and DSM IV)".
"Learning disability" means something like dyslexia for much of the world outside the UK, even in other languages (e.g., Lernbehinderung in German and Dificultades del aprendizaje in Spanish, both of which translate to "learning disabilities"), so I don't think that it would be a good idea to adopt the UK's terminology for this item. Perhaps after the DSM-V comes out, we can change it to their new term, which is Intellectual developmental disorder. WhatamIdoing (talk) 02:42, 28 March 2013 (UTC)
This webpage provides a good explanation of the different usages in different countries. While the term "mental retardation" might be used by medical professionals in the UK (the two articles cited specifically relate to Down's syndrome) is there any evidence that this term is ever used in an educational context? Dahliarose (talk) 22:49, 4 April 2013 (UTC)

The actual meaning of Special Education:[edit]

204.69.3.20 (talk) 21:22, 2 April 2013 (UTC)The actual meaning of special education-classes or instruction designed for students with special education needs. An early proponent of education for blind was Valentin Huay, who opened a school in 1784; his efforts persued those of Louis Braille.204.69.3.20 (talk) 21:22, 2 April 2013 (UTC)

PL94-142[edit]

I think this article could benefit from the addition of information on PL94-142 as this is where it all began. — Preceding unsigned comment added by Griffin18 (talkcontribs) 02:02, 29 March 2016 (UTC)

A Touch More Detail[edit]

This article does a great job of giving a general over view of special education, I think that it should provide more details and facts on the types of learning disabilities that are included in special education. Should also describe the steps that a teacher or parent must take in order for a child to receive special education services. Should also include various laws associated with special education, and what public schools in the united states are required to do for students with disabilities. — Preceding unsigned comment added by Disarnot (talkcontribs) 00:55, 31 March 2016 (UTC)

Including Special Needs Education for Teachers[edit]

According to a study that revolved around educating teachers on how to institute a curriculum for special needs, an increase in confidence and ability in teachers resulted in a positive change in 4 in 6 students. It also showed an increase in teacher confidence which could result in positive benefits, however there remains the need to develop a fully functional and acceptable curriculum. References: • Gianoumis, Stamatios; Seiverling, Laura; Sturming, Peter. "The Effect of Behavioral Skills Training on Correct Teacher Implementation of Natural Language Paradigm Teaching Skills and Child Behavior." Behavioral Intervention 27 (2) (2012). 57-74. Psychology and Behavioral Sciences Collection. Web. 18 April, 2016. http://search.ebscohost.com.libdb.ppcc.edu/login.aspx?direct=true&db=pbh&AN=74281005&site=ehost-live

• Mustafa Arif, Muhammad; Niazy, Ayesha; Hassan, Bilal; Ahmed, Farah. "Awareness of Autism in Primary School Teachers." Autism Research and Treatment (2013). 1-5. Academic Search Complete. Web. 18 April, 2016. http://search.ebscohost.com.libdb.ppcc.edu/login.aspx?direct=true&db=a9h&AN=95270033&site=ehost-live — Preceding unsigned comment added by 2601:281:C501:A700:5133:811F:F919:4867 (talk) 03:17, 29 April 2016 (UTC)

  1. ^ Verstraete, 2005, p. 120
  2. ^ Amary, 1980, p. 4
  3. ^ Amary, 1980, p. 4
  4. ^ Verstraete, 2005, p. 129
  5. ^ Amary, 1980, p. 5
  6. ^ Amary, 1980
  7. ^ Amary, 1980, p. 5