Talk:Spirulina (dietary supplement)

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Questionable references[edit]

"Dried spirulina contains about 60% (51–71%) protein. It is a complete protein containing all essential amino acids, though with reduced amounts of methionine, cysteine and lysine when compared to the proteins of meat, eggs and milk. It is, however, superior to typical plant protein, such as that from legumes."

>What do you mean by superior protein??? There's no reason to call meat protein better than legumes protein or spirulin protein. This type of terminology is no longer used and is absolete.


"Companies which grow and market spirulina have claimed it to be a significant source of B12 on the basis of alternative, unpublished assays, although their claims are not accepted by independent scientific organizations."

>Talking of a very conceited way of making observations on a work supposed to be respected as an encyclopedia. You just nulified the effect that you were trying to push forth. Such an abusive language clearly shows what your views are on the topic. Also, the references listed lack in consitency since only one was an actual study, the other was a brief mention. If you are trying to prove that Spirulina is not a good source of b12 so that people eat more meat, vegans already know that. That's why there are b12 pills. And vegans are not the only ones who suffer from b12 deficiency, most americans do, knowingly or not, even after consuming such gigantic quantities of animal products.


"The U.S. National Library of Medicine said that spirulina was no better than milk or meat as a protein source, and was approximately 30 times more expensive per gram."

>Another ridiculous claim. True it is expensive, but 30 times seems largely over exagerated. I saw a pound of raw spirulina on sale for 15 dollars. How did they get that 30 figure goes beyond my comprehension. Instead of spreading incorrect information, you should be more intrusive on how much a pound of meat really costs in water, soil destruction, trees cut down and destruction of the ozone layer and not on how much money the current government subsidizes the absolete meat industry. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 70.52.88.7 (talk) 00:10, 27 January 2015 (UTC)

Cyanobacteria are not green algae[edit]

The following paragraphs about a virus of green algae should not be in this article, which is about a cyanobacterium:

Scientists at the Johns Hopkins Medical School and the University of Nebraska have discovered an algae virus that makes us more stupid by infecting our brains. The researchers were conducting a completely unrelated study into throat microbes when they realised that DNA in the throats of healthy people matched the DNA of a chlorovirus virus known as ATCV-1.
ATCV-1 is a virus that infects the green algae found in freshwater lakes and ponds. It had previously been thought to be non-infectious to humans, but the scientists found that it actually affects cognitive functions in the brain by shortening attention span and causing a decrease in spatial awareness.[1]

[Emphasis added]

References

  1. ^ [1], Johns Hopkins Medical School, Nov. 2014.

I removed the above. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 86.130.247.72 (talk) 17:31, 15 February 2015 (UTC)

bad source[edit]

I removed the following content:

It may help in diabetes mellitus.[1]

References

  1. ^ Kulshreshtha, A.; Zacharia, J.; Jarouliya, U. et al. (2008). "Spirulina in Health Care Management". Current Pharmaceutical Biotechnology 9 (5): 400–405. doi:10.2174/138920108785915111. PMID 18855693. 

The author of that article works for Bisen Biotech & Biopharma Pvt. Ltd. which is a company that sold spirulina as a dietary supplement and the article is very promotional. This is not the kind of thing we should be including in WP. On top of that the content based on the source is uselessly vague. I replaced this content with updated content from a better source. Jytdog (talk) 23:14, 27 June 2015 (UTC)