Talk:Sports commentator

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
WikiProject Sports (Rated Start-class)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Sports, a WikiProject which aims to improve coverage of sport-related topics on Wikipedia. For more information, visit the project page, where you can join the project and/or contribute to the discussion.
Start-Class article Start  This article has been rated as Start-Class on the project's quality scale.
 ???  This article has not yet received a rating on the project's importance scale.
 
WikiProject Professional wrestling (Rated Start-class, Mid-importance)
WikiProject icon Sports commentator is within the scope of WikiProject Professional wrestling, an attempt to improve and standardize articles related to professional wrestling. If you would like to participate, you can edit the article attached to this page, visit the project to-do page, or visit the project page, where you can join the project and contribute to discussions.
Start-Class article Start  This article has been rated as Start-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Mid  This article has been rated as Mid-importance on the project's importance scale.
 

Misc[edit]

yeah much do they make a year, a month, a week? It varies. Some can make millions. Local sportscasters for teams make six figures. TV reporters make anywhere from 50,000 to 100,000. Radio pays the worst. About 50,000 to 100,000 a year. That's alot

There should be a section on Sportscasters and how they are involved in other things. Some Sportscasters, such as John Madden, have their own video games (Madden football games)! HaLoGuY007 00:49, 25 April 2007 (UTC)

The branches to color commentator, presenter & sideline reporter are helpful but a similar definition of a Play-by-Play announcer would be nice.

Additional discussion is needed of commentator techniques and the flow of commentary during a sporting event. For example, what typically is presented in pre-game, post-game, more in-depth instant replay commentary or filler commentary done during timeouts? How much is improvisational and what tends to be fully scripted?

Also, discussion of the differences between print (newspaper & magazine), radio & TV commentary might be interesting. Is the reporting different for arena based events as opposed to where spectators are impractical? How the different perspectives from a sportsbooth vs. multiple camera systems in remote studios vs. a sportswriter's bullpen vs. sidelines vs. from within the crowd can affect what is presented? Do radio commentators, news sportscasters, or print reporters present more/different details? Do they tend to give more (or less) emotional commentary? How about the use of TV tools like instant replay, dashboard cameras, the Electronic chalkboard or Closed Captioning with muted video in sports bars?

Perhaps even a discussion of how the Closed Captioning of sports commentary has such a high error rate compared to other live captioning. (Most likely because the pace of speech can be so much higher than many other live reporting. Or perhaps because commentary contains more names & odd catch phrases that stenographers are unlikely to have in their custom shorthand dictionaries.)

Moron Alert![edit]

Some dicks been throwing the word "poop" all over this article. please suspend him from editing —Preceding unsigned comment added by 74.75.102.66 (talk) 02:14, 14 November 2007 (UTC)

Controversies section[edit]

"Society viewed the issue as women sportswriters only wanting access to the men’s locker room to see players naked. After the access of allowing women in was put into effect, the Yankees organization allowed reporters to spend 10 minutes interviewing players and was then asked to leave and wait. Male reporters were unhappy with this and blamed the women from keeping them out and not being able to do their job. For some men they finally understood what women reporters had been dealing with.

In 1990, the issue made its way back into the headlines when Lisa Olson made a public statement revealing that players from the New England Patriots had exposed themselves while interviews were being conducted. This prompted other female reporters who had been harassed to come forward. Accusations were made that women appeared as being “too friendly” while performing interviews or conversing too long with players as though they were flirting. Their credibility became undermined. Thus, the issue of sexism was still present, despite the equal access to men’s locker rooms"

This whole section doesn't appear to be written from a neutral POV and also includes a lot of "Some X" type statements, e.g. "Society viewed", "Males were unhappy", etc. I toyed with a couple of rewrites but couldn't come up with something that did it justice. I'll try again later but if someone else wants to give it a crack, go ahead. Statalyzer (talk) 23:29, 27 October 2016 (UTC)

Agree. It's told from a female perspective. It also don't mention one bit about male reporters getting access to female athlete locker rooms. Is it allowed, if so, when was the policy instituted, etc. 2600:8805:5800:F500:9C9D:6AB3:CBF8:A317 (talk) 01:21, 19 December 2016 (UTC)