Talk:Stab-in-the-back myth

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Effect on World War II[edit]

I removed the following text. It looks like original research to me, and much of it is alternate-historical speculation. The request for a source went unmet for some time.

Some believe that the Allied policy of unconditional surrender in World War II was, in part, a response to the Dolchstosslegende. {{fact}} However, this ignores other dynamics of the policy, namely that the United States and the United Kingdom were concerned what would happen if they did not show solidarity with the Soviets and Stalin were to make a separate peace with Germany. Additionally, the decision for unconditional surrender was also an important step for the Allies to rally the public and commit them to the cause.

Still, in light of the situation that had developed in Germany after the World War I armistice, the concept of unconditional surrender was rather popular during World War II, especially amidst anti-German sentiment and the interpretation that the Germans needed to be "taught a lesson" in order to end perceptions of the German Army's invincibility.

In 1944, if Count Stauffenberg and his co-conspirators had succeeded in killing Hitler and ousting the Nazi government, there may have been a great deal of public pressure for the Allies to reverse such terms. Nevertheless, unconditional surrender and the Dolchstosslegende can be used to, at least partially, explain why the plot and others like it received no coordinated help from the Allies.

— Preceding unsigned comment added by Robert A West (talkcontribs) 2006-08-11

Hitlers Voters[edit]

"Der Dolchstoß is cited as an important factor in Adolf Hitler's later rise to power, as the Nazi Party grew its original political base largely from embittered World War I veterans"

Be careful with such statement unless you dont prove it. There are different souces showing who supported Hitler most. It werent classical conservatives. The "new" middle class was his main support.— Preceding unsigned comment added by 89.57.2.107 (talkcontribs) 2008-10-12

update[edit]

The quote, as given by William Manchester on p. 432 of "The Arms of Krupp," is "The Generalstab [general staff] was stabbed in the back!"— Preceding unsigned comment added by 24.53.123.71 (talkcontribs) 2006-07-01

The German officers were the ones ending the war[edit]

Shouldn't this page explain how the war ended?

The German forces were more efficient than those of the Triple Entente. It cost significantly less for the Germans to kill a soldier of the Triple Entente, than the other way around. Germany could have fought on longer than they did, but the German officers realized it was a lost cause and ordered the soldiers to put down their weapons. This was not a coordinated thing. That makes it quite interesting. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 89.253.73.146 (talk) 21:59, 10 April 2015 (UTC)

All of which is the stab in the back myth. The German military lost the war during the Spring Offensive and were close to collapse due to the Allied counterattacks, coupled with an increasing desertion rate and the collapse of the Home Front.EnigmaMcmxc (talk) 23:46, 10 April 2015 (UTC)
That's an odd declaration. You named the reason: "the collapse of the Home Front". That is what they call the stab in the back. There were still millions of soldiers that were free to go home because the Home Front had become divided by socialists on one side and nationalists on the other. Bataaf van Oranje (talk) 14:23, 19 June 2015 (UTC)

GA Review[edit]

This review is transcluded from Talk:Stab-in-the-back myth/GA1. The edit link for this section can be used to add comments to the review.

Reviewer: Viriditas (talk · contribs) 20:13, 11 May 2015 (UTC)


Criteria[edit]

Review[edit]

  1. Well-written:
    Criteria Notes Result
    (a) (prose) The reviewer has no notes here. Neutral Undetermined
    (b) (MoS) The reviewer has no notes here. Neutral Undetermined
  2. Verifiable with no original research:
    Criteria Notes Result
    (a) (references) The reviewer has no notes here. Neutral Undetermined
    (b) (citations to reliable sources) Does not meet the criterion. Fail Fail
    (c) (original research) Previous concerns on talk. Sourcing needs to be explicit per above. Don't know Don't know
  3. Broad in its coverage:
    Criteria Notes Result
    (a) (major aspects) The reviewer has no notes here. Neutral Undetermined
    (b) (focused) The reviewer has no notes here. Neutral Undetermined
  4. Neutral: it represents viewpoints fairly and without bias, giving due weight to each.
    Notes Result
    The reviewer has no notes here. Neutral Undetermined
  5. Stable: it does not change significantly from day to day because of an ongoing edit war or content dispute.
    Notes Result
    The reviewer has no notes here. Neutral Undetermined
  6. Illustrated, if possible, by images:
    Criteria Notes Result
    (a) (images are tagged and non-free images have fair use rationales) The reviewer has no notes here. Neutral Undetermined
    (b) (appropriate use with suitable captions) The reviewer has no notes here. Neutral Undetermined

Result[edit]

Result Notes
Fail Fail I am quick-failing this nom for two reasons: 1) this article fails to meet criterion 2b, one of our most important indicators of GA status, and 2) previous concerns about original research appear on the talk page, making adherence to criterion 2b of the highest importance. Please add inline sources and re-nominate. Viriditas (talk) 21:11, 11 May 2015 (UTC)

Discussion[edit]

Please add any related discussion here.

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