Talk:Standard deviation

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Sentence says the opposite of what it means[edit]

In the introduction, the second sentence of the second paragraph reads:

    It is algebraically simpler, though in practice less robust, than the average absolute deviation.

I'm positive that this isn't correct, since the standard deviation is more complicated and more robust than the AAD. I think that whoever wrote this simply made a mistake, swapping the subject and object of the sentence. It should read:

    It is algebraically more complex, though in practice more robust, than the average absolute deviation.

or

    The average absolute deviation is algebraically simpler, though in practice less robust, than the standard deviation.

Thoughts? -Somebody without an account :) — Preceding unsigned comment added by 132.241.174.230 (talk) 22:02, 30 April 2019 (UTC)

Somebody with an account:

   I'm positive that this isn't correct, since the standard deviation is more complicated...

Is it, though? I think most people would find squaring/square roots more complicated than subtracting two numbers and throwing away the negative sign. As to the other points, maybe they were referring to the effects of squaring with respect to outliers and leverage.

EntangledLoops (talk) 18:17, 5 June 2020 (UTC)

Thousands separator?[edit]

What is going on with the formatting of the "Squared difference from mean" column of the "Sum of squares calculation for female fulmars" table under "Basic examples" / "Sample standard deviation of metabolic rate of northern fulmars"?

The formatting is rendering the numbers as if it was using a thousands separator, but the character used was a space instead of a comma.

Ah, I just looked it up.. At

 https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/globalization/locale/number-formatting#:~:text=The%20character%20used%20as%20the,thousands%20separator%20is%20a%20space.

they say that the thousands separator is a space in Sweden. Does wikipedia's infrastructure allow region-specific rendering of the data, such that a US reader would see a comma as a thousands separator, a Swedish reader would see a space, and a German reader would see a period?

Jlkeegan (talk) 20:16, 24 August 2020 (UTC)

@Jlkeegan: See MOS:DIGITS for the appropriate guidelines. The short version is that either commas or gaps may be used (gaps are not unique to Sweden; they're common in a lot of scientific contexts regardless of language). And to answer the other part, no, Wikipedia has no way to customize number formats. –Deacon Vorbis (carbon • videos) 20:42, 24 August 2020 (UTC)