Talk:Standard deviation

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Please use proper colors in the drawings[edit]

The chosen colors are like a color vision test. Please use distinct and bright colors, especially because of green, yellow and red being too close. It's more important to be accessible than to pick colors by other factors. Bright yellow, bright green and red, make it more accessible. Thanks. I am referring to this picture in particular: Variance_visualisation.svg

Sentence says the opposite of what it means[edit]

In the introduction, the second sentence of the second paragraph reads:

    It is algebraically simpler, though in practice less robust, than the average absolute deviation.

I'm positive that this isn't correct, since the standard deviation is more complicated and more robust than the AAD. I think that whoever wrote this simply made a mistake, swapping the subject and object of the sentence. It should read:

    It is algebraically more complex, though in practice more robust, than the average absolute deviation.

or

    The average absolute deviation is algebraically simpler, though in practice less robust, than the standard deviation.

Thoughts? -Somebody without an account :)

Verbal vs math notation[edit]

STANDARD DEVIATION A measure of dispersion of a frequency distribution equal to the square root of the mean of the squares of the deviations from the the arithmetic mean of the distribution." (Random House Dictionary of the English Language. 2d edition. 1966. Words communicate to many people better than math notation.) Patshannon+ (talk) 02:28, 20 May 2019 (UTC)PatrickDShannon@gmail.com

Confusing statement[edit]

In the forth paragraph there is a confusing statement "...is computed from the standard error of the mean (or alternatively from the product of the standard deviation of the population and the inverse of the square root of the sample size, which is the same thing) and is typically about twice the standard deviation..." This seems like an error - if SEM is calculated "...product of the standard deviation of the population and the inverse of the square root of the sample size..." how can the result be..."about twice the standard deviation..."

--IcyEd (talk) 11:21, 4 September 2019 (UTC)