Talk:Standard molar entropy

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The Gibbs free energy discussion is a little superfluous to the point and could be referenced to the free energy article. But what else is there to say? Olin 00:57, 14 February 2006 (UTC)

A table of S° values might be useful, especially for elements, where it is not listed on the article (as it is for several compounds). --Phoenix9 19:10, 20 February 2006 (UTC)

From PNA/Chemicals[edit]

all inadequate stubs. --Eequor 21:10, 15 Aug 2004 (UTC)

    • My God, these are awful! I'll see what I can do with them. Physchim62 09:08, 11 Jun 2005 (UTC)


I moved the list of contributors to Chemistry, even though they don't specifically apply to chemistry. The list just seemed a little too in-depth to leave in the intro.

I am also unsure about how much info on chemical reactions belongs in this article. For instance, calculating the change in entropy of surroundings is the next step in identifying a spontaneous reaction, so that applies to the use of standard molar entropy. But is that getting too off-topic? Zadeez 23:50, 17 February 2007 (UTC)