Talk:Static margin

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
WikiProject Physics / Fluid Dynamics  (Rated Start-class, Low-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Physics, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of Physics on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
Start-Class article Start  This article has been rated as Start-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Low  This article has been rated as Low-importance on the project's importance scale.
This article is supported by Fluid Dynamics Taskforce.
 

Definition[edit]

I changed the definition from "It is defined as the distance from the center of gravity of the vehicle and the center of pressure of the vehicle" to "It is defined as the distance between the center of gravity of the vehicle and the center of pressure of the vehicle," because the first sentence doesn't make sense. Somebody please check if the content of the definition is still correct. Vinnivince 07:54, 13 August 2007 (UTC)

Your correction is correct. Thanks for catching such a stupid error.Mangogirl2 02:31, 15 September 2007 (UTC)

I don't think so. Static Margin is defined as the distance between aerodynamic center and center of gravity, not center of pressure. Center of pressure moves with angle of attack, whereas aerodynamic center remains constant. Defining static margin about the Cp will undoubtedly cause headaches for anyone using the definition in simulation. Alex —Preceding unsigned comment added by 128.46.5.29 (talk) 15:07, 23 October 2007 (UTC)

I have done simulaton of air vehicles for 25 years and I never used static margin in the simulation. You could but I see little benefit in it. Static Margin is simply a definition and it appears that different communities may define it differntly. While not called out in the articld in my experience static margin is define relative to the center of pressure at low angle of attack (i.e near zero). Alex might want to expand the article to include his definition but I am unfamiliar with it and uncomfortable with it.14:26, 30 October 2007 (UTC) —Preceding unsigned comment added by Mangogirl2 (talkcontribs)