Talk:Station (Australian agriculture)

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Categories[edit]

I have removed the Livestock and Real Estate categories. These are not justified. -- Alan Liefting (talk) - 18:59, 17 November 2008 (UTC)

Photo of Station[edit]

The picture evidently shows a farm, since there is a traffic sign visiable. The stations i have been on are a long way from the front gate, and you would typically not see such things near the station house. (I've lived on both...)

Also, it looks something like a dairy farm to me. --Wendy.krieger (talk) 08:49, 2 December 2009 (UTC)

I took the photo and this is a large remote cattle station in NSW, too far away from anywhere to be a dairy.Cgoodwin (talk) 23:27, 2 December 2009 (UTC)

Jackaroo and jillaroo[edit]

Jackaroo (trainee) and Jillaroo (trainee) are redirects that currently link here. However, Jackaroo (trainee) probably should be an article, with Jillaroo (trainee) a redirect to that article. Both redirects now have incoming links; formerly they were piped to Stockman. 69.3.72.249 (talk) 17:21, 29 September 2010 (UTC)

Silly to make a tiny article. Expand sections in existing articles until they are big enough to warrant their own. Too many stubs. Montanabw(talk) 20:20, 29 September 2010 (UTC)
I agree with Montanabw. There are other more common workers that are performing the same duties in OZ.Cgoodwin (talk) 21:56, 29 September 2010 (UTC)
Just bringing this up to date: Jackaroo (trainee) is now a decent article with a fair coverage of the history of the term's usage, evolution and social implications, and Jillaroo (trainee) is a redirect to the same article. The references are adequate. However, see #Ringer.

Ringer[edit]

Other terms (besides #jackaroo) mentioned in § Personnel still need clarification, including ringer; boreman; and grader [driver].

The most detail I've found on the different meanings of "ringer" (and related terms) on Aussie stations (not to be confused with dead ringer, also current Aussie slang) is in the blog article and comments: Cowboy, ringer or stockman? by Lisa Clarke, 27 May 2013. The description of a "ringer" in stockman (Australia) covers only some of this ground; in particular, it doesn't cover the usage "ringer" to distinguish those stockmen who work in the stock camps from those who work mostly at the head station, i.e. near the owner's or manager's house ("homestead" or "station").

Nor is there a clear etymology for the term "ringer" as used here.

Warning: The following is speculation only; I have no sources for any of it! Two possibilities spring to mind:

  1. That, as a seasonal worker only, he was a bit of an outsider to the station's patriarchal social hierarchy, somebody to call on or "ring in" only when economically necessary (the noun form "ring-in" for a substitute has long been used in Australia); and
  2. That, as a worker based at one of the stock camps that ring the central station, that is, a "ring camp" – an expression which I seem to recall reading many years ago, but memory is notoriously unreliable!

Further research is necessary to clarify these terms with reference to reliable sources. yoyo (talk) 04:25, 23 January 2017 (UTC)

Cockburn, Rodney. Pastoral Pioneers of South Australia, vol 1 & 2 available at ANU[edit]

A useful resource -- Paul foord (talk) 12:33, 3 March 2013 (UTC)