Talk:Steeple

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Removed[edit]

3-8-07 Removed this paragraph, which seems more like frivolous proselytizing:

"A common myth claims that the steeple is based in earlier Pagan architecture. It is said that the Pagan steeple was originally constructed to symbolize the male phallus. This completely incorrect idea is rooted in anti-Roman Catholic author Alexander Hislop's general attempt to dismiss Catholicism as paganism in disguise, as described in his 1858 book " The Two Babylons, or The Papal Worship Proved to Be the Worship of Nimrod and His Wife." While Hislop did not claim steeples are pagan in origin, his follower Ralph Woodrow did in his own 1966 book "Babylon Mystery Religion." Woodrow has since recanted his claims, which had no evidence to support them anyway." 72.16.36.16 15:32, 8 March 2007 (UTC) Kel


Encyclopedic treatment[edit]

Dictionary thinking produces separate entries for Spire and Steeple (architecture) — which is "often crowned by a spire" anyway. On the other hand, encyclopedic treatment draws both together in one article that, as part of its job, distinguishes the two terms. --Wetman 22:42, 18 September 2007 (UTC)

Towers[edit]

I've noticed that all of these towers have spires on them. Should I upload a self-made photo of a church without a spire? They're quite common in the UK. Brammers (talk) 15:51, 7 September 2009 (UTC)

That is a good idea.[edit]

Yes, please do add a picture of a steeple without a spire. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 99.229.82.211 (talk) 23:42, 10 January 2012 (UTC)

Requested move[edit]

The following discussion is an archived discussion of a requested move. Please do not modify it. Subsequent comments should be made in a new section on the talk page. Editors desiring to contest the closing decision should consider a move review. No further edits should be made to this section.

The result of the move request was: moved per request. Favonian (talk) 17:36, 16 August 2013 (UTC)


– The architectural feature is by far the most common meaning of this term, and the one that readers are most likely to be looking for. The other meanings are clearly secondary. 168.12.253.66 (talk) 14:46, 9 August 2013 (UTC)

  • oh good grief yes This peculiar situation dates back to 2004, if you can believe that, but three little towns and a minor peak are plainly secondary to the architectural term. Mangoe (talk) 19:00, 9 August 2013 (UTC)
  • Support per nom. Deor (talk) 15:09, 10 August 2013 (UTC)
  • Support. nom explains it well. Cas Liber (talk · contribs) 04:31, 12 August 2013 (UTC)
  • Support. Clear primary topic. -- Necrothesp (talk) 14:17, 12 August 2013 (UTC)
The above discussion is preserved as an archive of a requested move. Please do not modify it. Subsequent comments should be made in a new section on this talk page or in a move review. No further edits should be made to this section.