Talk:Styx (band)

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Untitled[edit]

External link[edit]

I'd like to add a video interview with Dennis DeYoung to external links. He is speaking about Styx and band dynamics. Here is the interview. Ammosh11 20:58, 18 June 2007 (UTC)

Excellent interview. I believe it will bring a lot of people together who believe that DDY is Styx or that Tommy/JY are Styx. Styx is a BAND; always has been, always will be.--Bamadude 23:50, 15 September 2007 (UTC)

Chuck and John's backing Vocals[edit]

I was curious about the backing vocals contributed by John and Chuck as they are always credited yet never much spoke about. I saw the Pieces of Eight tour twice and the Cornerstone tour and remember that the backing vocals that Styx produced was even better than the recordings which still remain stunning. I can remember reading that George Martin was even more taken by the vocal blend of the Bee Gees voices than the Beatles simply because of their genetic link which meant the physical structure of their vocal chords was much closer than those of John, Paul, George, and Ringo. This is not to say anything contrary to the stunning beauty of the Beatles however whenever I listen to the recordings of Styx I wonder about the effect of having siblings singing in harmony. Just listen to power of the Cowsills wall of sound for example.

I have never heard any comments about the vocal contributions of the brothers however I imagine that their genetic link could be an understated power center of the harmonies. Anyone who heard them live had to admit that the beauty of Styx' harmonies was very unique, powerful and had a character not fully able to be captured by a recording device. The analog synthesizers that Dennis played also had this quality.

Any comments? — Preceding unsigned comment added by 108.50.182.182 (talk) 11:42, 19 April 2014 (UTC)

Chuck Panozzo[edit]

Why is Chuck Panozzo listed under "Current members" if he left in 1998? Badagnani 03:01, 7 December 2006 (UTC)

Probably because it's less accurate to call him a former member; Chuck still joins the band as often as he can, according to the last entry I saw at StyxWorld. RadioKirk (u|t|c) 03:33, 7 December 2006 (UTC)
Chuck is still listed on Styxworld.com (the official Styx site) as a member. Chuck did leave as a full-time member in 1998, but it's agreed that Chuck can have his full-time position back anytime he wants it and he plays at a number of shows each year, so he's a part-time member (so to speak), and anybody playing bass, though a member of the band (per se) is considered a "fill-in" until and if Chuck ever comes back. He was diagnosed as HIV-positive in 1998 & with prostate cancer in 2004, so his full-time return would certainly be against all odds, but he's still a member of Styx nonetheless and an original member at that.--Bamadude 00:26, 16 September 2007 (UTC)
Chuck still plays at 75% of the shows for about 4 songs, he was at the show last night in St Louis (12/28/06) He also played on a song on Big Bang Theory. He's still an intricate part of the band.Styxfannh 19:29, 29 December 2006 (UTC)

I don't recall Ricky Phillips being a part of Styx in 2004. Glen Burtnik was touring with Styx in 2003-2004 in support of Cyclorama. and he was set to record on the "Big Bang Theory" CD, but he had stated that he was leaving the band due to personal reasons, which Tommy Shaw said on Styx's website had more to do with his being homesick and away from his family (wife and daughter) than with the fact that Kiss Your Ass Goodbye (which incidently was written by all the members of the current line up of Styx) not charting. Ricky Phillips wasn't mentioned as being in the band until the summer of 2005 when Tommy Shaw commented that they were doing some dates before recording a new CD (what was supposed to be original songs) but was asked to release a cover version of "I Am The Walrus" and Styx rushed to record it live with then-new bass player Ricky Phillips.(These comments were left by user kilroy2006 and edited by Bamadude to be readable by human beings.--Bamadude 00:26, 16 September 2007 (UTC))

Glen left in September of 2003 and was replaced by Ricky Phillips. Glen was long gone when Big Bang Theory came into existence. "Kiss Your Ass Goodbye" was written by Glen, "One With Everything" was written by the entire band together. "Kiss Your Ass Goodbye" was never released as a single and therfore couldn't chart. Glen later included it in his Welcome To Hollywood CD. Styx did the Beatles cover of "I Am A Walrus" at the Eric Clapton Crossroads Festival in Dallas on June 5, 2004. They then added it to their set and DJ Greg Solk from WLUP in Chicago told them they would play it if they recorded it. They recorded it at Chinook Winds Casino in Lincoln City, Oregon on September 10, 2004. http://styxworld.com/listingsEntry.asp?ID=135870&PT=TheBand Styxfannh 19:25, 29 December 2006 (UTC)
No, Ricky joined the band around the end of 2003.(Another unsigned comment left by user kilroy2006)
Ricky became a member of Styx on 9/22/03[1]. Styxfannh 01:05, 29 December 2006 (UTC)

Prog?[edit]

I have never called Styx progressive. And there isnt a source. So Im taking it off. Prepare to be Mezmerized! :D 19:40, 12 November 2007 (UTC)

Someone beat me to the obvious revert. YOU haven't called Styx progressive? Bully for you. A Google search turned up 8 independent sources on the first three pages alone. (Here's one[1] that at least acknowledges the fact that they reside somewhere in the pop/arena rock/prog rock triple point.) Quite a few authors have worked on this page and we have hashed and re-hashed over virtually every word in the article, as the discussion archives will show. We welcome you joining us as a participating author, but it would be best on any subjective point if you discuss first and edit later. Dpiranha 21:27, 12 November 2007 (UTC)
To add to that... (since my original text hit an edit conflict :D )... They started out very progressive and carried prog elements in their music even when they found a more a more mainstream direction. All Music Guide mentions this style being tied to the band on many occasions. All of their albums on Wikipedia have AMG links for reviews. And all those reviews list Prog and art rock among the band's namy styles. The 'genre impairment' edit has been corrected. 156.34.217.117 21:29, 12 November 2007 (UTC)
In the 1970s in high school and university, we used to debate who was progressive and who was not. Everybody knew or liked Styx; nobody considered them to be progressive. Too light. Art rock, sure. Progressive, no. That's a Toronto perspective. I also don't recall anybody considering Toronto heroes Rush to be progressive in those days. The term has become broader, and that is ok with me. Varlaam (talk) 20:20, 22 June 2011 (UTC)
There was consensus on Styx. The more serious debate was over Kansas. I was in the minority, since I considered Kansas to be light but progressive, and I took a lot of shit over that. I own no Styx CDs, just one LP. I do not freely admit that I like Leftoverture to this day. Varlaam (talk)
Although I do not think Styx really are a Progressive rock band, I can make my peace with calling it that way. But not before Art rock. The first genre that should come to one's mind when thinking of Styx is Art rock. And I can't believe Art rock is not even mentioned in the genre list in the Styx article. Tzvetlin (talk) 14:56, 26 August 2012 (UTC)

Hello, i have referenced both progressive and art rock in the infobox.

Fair use rationale for Image:StyxLogo2.png[edit]

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BetacommandBot (talk) 19:41, 26 November 2007 (UTC)

Fair use rationale for Image:Kilroy2.jpg[edit]

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Image:Kilroy2.jpg is being used on this article. I notice the image page specifies that the image is being used under fair use but there is no explanation or rationale as to why its use in this Wikipedia article constitutes fair use. In addition to the boilerplate fair use template, you must also write out on the image description page a specific explanation or rationale for why using this image in each article is consistent with fair use.

Please go to the image description page and edit it to include a fair use rationale. Using one of the templates at Wikipedia:Fair use rationale guideline is an easy way to insure that your image is in compliance with Wikipedia policy, but remember that you must complete the template. Do not simply insert a blank template on an image page.

If there is other fair use media, consider checking that you have specified the fair use rationale on the other images used on this page. Note that any fair use images lacking such an explanation can be deleted one week after being tagged, as described on criteria for speedy deletion. If you have any questions please ask them at the Media copyright questions page. Thank you.

BetacommandBot (talk) 17:50, 2 January 2008 (UTC)

This image, from the Kilroy Was Here album, is used to give information about that album in the article concept albums. The image is also used to describe the album in Styx (band). The image qualifies as fair use per Wiki policy. --98percenthuman (talk) 20:55, 4 January 2008 (UTC)

Not first band with four consecutive multi-platinum albums.[edit]

This is one of the first sentences in the first paragraph of the page. They were not the first band to have four multi-platinum albums one after the other. Led Zeppelin made this achievement even before Styx's first album came out. Am I misunderstanding something here or did they just want to up Styx's reputation? —Preceding unsigned comment added by 71.123.139.145 (talk) 16:53, 4 April 2008 (UTC)

actually, it has been written about, announced officially on tv shows, and recorded in musical record books, I believe. So this is definitely a fact AND credible. Styx WAS the first band to achieve this, one of those Led Zeppelin albums believed to be part of the four multi-platinum was not quite multiplatinum. Common misunderstanding. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 24.1.161.205 (talk) 21:56, 18 April 2011 (UTC)
If you look on Led Zeppelin discography, it shows multi-platinum by a wide margin for 8 in a row of their 9 studio albums, and it appears to have a viable source. What gives? BollyJeff || talk 16:03, 24 June 2011 (UTC)
From Led Zeppelin discography, 8x, 12x, 6x, 23x, 11x, 16x, 3x, and 6x. If no one can explain this, we have to remove the claim that Styx was first from this article. BollyJeff || talk 18:04, 26 July 2011 (UTC)
Actually, looking at Led Zep albums on RIAA site, maybe it's that Styx made those platinum ratings in 1984, and the Led Zep albums received their current ratings in the 1990s and later. They have been selling from release date up until the present day, whereas Styx made most of their sales when the albums were released. Does this make any sense? Is anyone reading this?? BollyJeff || talk 18:12, 26 July 2011 (UTC)
Bollyjeff, I am reading this, and what you say most definitely makes sense :-) What strikes me more about the whole "first act to be awarded 4 consecutive multiplatinum albums" thing is that the Beatles certainly have achieved this feat before? Accoding to this Wikipedia page https://secure.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/wiki/List_of_The_Beatles%27_record_sales their global record sales were upward of 100 million in early 1965, with only 4 albums out at the time. Even if this includes singles and the UK/US releases are counted separately, that would surely suffice for multiplatinum in the US? Would love to hear your take on this. Hope this is not some silly thing, like, other artists achieved the feat before but Styx were the first to actually get the award ... --Georgepauljohnringo (talk) 17:43, 12 August 2011 (UTC)
I'm pretty sure that IS one of those silly things, exactly. The Beatles sold many, many millions of albums, but Capitol and/or Apple probably never bothered to submit all the sales figures to the RIAA for multiplatinum certification, which didn't exist until 197X or whatever year it was, anyways. Vonbontee (talk) 07:45, 30 August 2011 (UTC)
Vonbontee, thanks for pointing this out. I wonder if we should add a note to the Styx page to that effect? I find the statement on the Styx page rather misleading as it is.
--Georgepauljohnringo (talk) 14:34, 30 August 2011 (UTC)
Agreed, some sort of caveat needs to be there. BollyJeff || talk 14:42, 30 August 2011 (UTC)

POPULARITY[edit]

I'm a newbie so kill me if you want, but the article USED TO say "was popular in the 70's and 80's".

Subjective, and WRONG. Styx is still around and is still popular, as evidenced by the dozens of sold-out shows they play every year.

I edited for the correct subjectiveness... article now reads "popular SINCE the 70's". —Preceding unsigned comment added by 68.229.43.127 (talk) 06:36, 29 April 2008 (UTC)

However, it is reasonable to indicate when someone was at the height of his popularity.
Phil Spector was popular. People still play records he produced like Let It Be. Now he's in jail.
Varlaam (talk) 20:26, 22 June 2011 (UTC)

Tipper once for me[edit]

Mrs. Gore's first public appeal on the subject of music lyrics came in response to hearing her daughter playing the song "Darling Nikki", which was released in 1984. She co-founded the PMRC in 1985. So while her inclusion in the Paradise Theater section is appropriately written, her inclusion in the Kilroy Was Here section is not. "Heavy Metal Poisoning" was released in 1983, and likely written in 1982, at a time when I'd venture to guess James Young had never heard of Tipper Gore. While it's understandable that her name became shorthand for a certain type of parental response to music among those who found it hysterical and overbearing, it's unencyclopedic to name-check her in a case where that response came from others, at a time when she had not yet felt moved to form the PMRC. That the PMRC would cite the band and the rumor of backward-masking in 1985 likely had something to do with a conclusion based upon the etymology of the band's name (as DeYoung is cited as inferring), but more to do with the fact of rumors that had been circulated by the religious right and others some years earlier. For the record, I have loved the band since childhood; I voted for Al Gore; I think the allegations of Satanism against the band were the result of ignorance; I enjoy the ironies of the intentional backward-masking on "Heavy Metal Poisoning"; and I think the effort to develop a ratings system for music is noble from the standpoint of society, vitally important from the standpoint of parenthood, counterproductive from the standpoint of censorship, and obtrusive (though not oppressive) from the standpoint of artistic creativity. While my first reaction to the PMRC was to scoff, if not chafe, maturity has brought me to see it from other angles. There are statutes governing what the other four senses can experience prior to a certain age, and profanity and "mature themes" are subject to ratings in film; say what you will about that, but music is a notable omission. Abrazame (talk) 06:19, 25 May 2008 (UTC)

The bigger question here is, where's the beef(y references)? You can't accuse groups or people of anything without some references, and the only Wikipedia link between Styx and the PMRC seems to be a link from the PMRC article to a dubious webpage that mentions none of the specifics claimed here. For now I've added some citation requests and made some other trims, but this entire section will go shortly if some refs aren't added. Jgm (talk) 12:41, 26 May 2008 (UTC)
That you see my attribution of "religous right" as the irresponsible accusation when both the point of the historical controversies and the mention in the article was that it was they who were accusing Styx of things—and that you immediately erased it without debate—is an irony I think Young, DeYoung and co. would appreciate. A reference request tag is something I see you're familiar with by your use of one elsewhere in your recent edits here. It's neither the mark of a good editor nor Wiki policy to simply delete things which you merely suspect may not be accurate, or which political correctness or subjective interpretation causes you to see a red flag in. Though of course it was not part of their "Filthy Fifteen", the PMRC did reference Styx in their crusade—two or three years after the Kilroy album, which is why I removed the second reference to Tipper Gore but not the first (as the first reference was written with factual accuracy). It is a matter of record, and if you or I can't find it online in ten minutes, maybe someone else interested enough in the issue being properly addressed here to track that down (or familiar enough to know what to cite without research), if you'd just tag it and note your request on the talk page here. Styx wasn't merely smeared with allegations, they were inspired to take the time, effort, creativity, and risk to create a concept album and stage show about it, so this article is certainly an appropriate place to write about this issue, especially as that show figured heavily in the band's breakup. The more important issue, both contextually and chronologically (as the references were in sections about 1981 and 1983 compositions) is not the PMRC facet some see as a self-fulfilled prophecy (ergo the double mention), but the real model for the "Majority for Musical Morality", which was the name of the fictional fascists in DeYoung's satire. He knew he wasn't dealing with Rhodes Scholars either in the target of his satire or his target audience, so he didn't craft a name too remote from the source of his chagrin, the Moral Majority. Right-wing religious activist Jerry Falwell (whom I did not name check in my edit, but who deserves mention more than Tipper Gore for the subject in question) was indeed a part of the religious right, and the period in question (1981) was indeed a time of ascendancy for Falwell's fame and political influence. The Moral Majority was a powerful, well-funded, right-wing, political lobbying group. By my mentioning that, I was not sniping at a sweet congregation of church people nor was I conflating the rumors of a smattering of individuals who held vague suspicions. The group emerged from a crumbling coalition in the late '70s with a more defined agenda and more determined and focused strategies for their multi-pronged approach, and are historically credited with getting Republican Ronald Reagan the evangelical vote to assume the presidency in that year, despite the fact that he was a Hollywood actor and governor of California (otherwise not elements seen by such a group as sympathetic to their values), while incumbent Jimmy Carter was a former wartime Navy Admiral and a born-again Christian. These are historical facts, not opinion. And this may seem to some visiting the Wiki page of Styx to be tangential, but the context in which society and culture tussles across the political, religious, societal, artistic, capitalistic and commercial levels is precisely the subtext Styx was dealing with in many of their songs over several years, although never so directly as during this period which, simmering previously, caught fire with "Snowblind" and culminates in the Kilroy extravaganza. The band's work was not merely the product of the times they operated in but in some way influenced the times as well, as evidenced by the controversy they found themselves caught up in for several years running. I have to not only assume that you and the other editor are not familiar with the issue but that you're not terribly interested with becoming so ("this entire section will go shortly" has a detached paternalism that may seem to some like the preferred style for an objective Wiki editor, but seems to me to be subjective in its overvaluation of the appearance of objectivity at the cost of accuracy which clearly would result in a worse article here, not a better one), but here is a New York Times article dealing with precisely these historical facts in precisely this context (the Kilroy tour) for anyone who is interested. [2] Further, the Wiki article to read on the subject is not the PMRC article but the well-referenced article on backmasking, which not only addresses the context of the religio-political atmosphere of the time accurately, but gives a snappier quote (that one may be an opinion on my part) from James "JY" Young than the one you removed by DeYoung [although DeYoung's quote addressed the stigma their name held with such groups]). As I'm not interested in starting a revert war and was simply trying to make the article more accurate by changing a string of a mere half-dozen words or so (and perhaps I am motivated somewhat by the hope that someone whose intention is to be a better editor will be moved to reevaluate their MO), I will leave it to you or others to unwhip your vanilla butter, or leave it here to congeal and sour the article until it is removed if you still see fit. In other words—and I only press these points because of your evolving elucidation of philosophies—are such "trims" as yours motivated by a desire to carry out the enforcement of rules, or an honest interest in presenting salient truth clearly and in proper context? Because, to go back to the stance you present above in regard to my edit, my assertion that it was the religious right who objected to Styx et al would not be seen by the Moral Majority or the current incarnations of the religious right as an accusation against them. They would see it as a point of pride; it was one of their raisons d'etre. Because of that, I thought it was obvious enough a point to be inserted without citation, and am quite surprised to find it removed twice in one day. Abrazame (talk) 02:32, 27 May 2008 (UTC)
As the person responsible for the first delete, my apologies. I didn't notice the explanation on the talk page before reacting to the edit which took a well-defined individual and group and replaced it with a more generic group giving the appearance of a politically or religiously-motivated agenda. But after reading your discussion and reviewing the various links, I see that you are correct. And certainly citations would be ideal, as Jgm points out, but I don't think the lack of them invalidates the section in the article. It was, after all, a major issue with the band as pointed out regarding Snowblind and Kilroy. Perhaps a brief reference in the main article could lead to a lengthier discussion on the page for the album itself. McJaje (talk) 15:35, 27 May 2008 (UTC)
And, whew. Not sure I absorbed everything from that slab of a paragraph, but to address what appear to be questions about my edits and their intents:
  • I have no agenda other than clarity, conciseness, and verifiability.
  • I have left the statement that Paradise was a target of the PMRC with a request for citation. The NYT article you point to is a good one and should be cited somewhere if it has not been, but it does not call out the PMRC (just saying the "religious right" which seems closer to McJaje's approach). I'm not saying it didn't happen, I'm just pointing out that controversial or accusatory statements need to be referenced.
  • "Tipper Gore's PMRC" is not an acceptable usage in my view. Those who want to understand the history and makeup of the PMRC can go to that (linked) article.
  • I shortened quotes in the interest of staying on topic and readability. If you think a longer quote is more appropriate in any spot I'd be glad to discuss here. All quotes are supposed to be referenced, by the way. Jgm (talk) 14:50, 28 May 2008 (UTC)

Mr Roboto[edit]

They played a concert here last night, and didn't do Mr.Roboto. Other people said they'd been to previous concerts, and they didn't play it then either. Does anyone know, if they just don't play it any more since the CD came at a bad time for them? Cantras 129.186.26.165 (talk) 20:50, 23 July 2008 (UTC)

Styx does not play Mr. Roboto and only played it on the Kilroy tour. They will play snippets of it from time to time. Dennis does perform it on his solo shows. DJMike —Preceding unsigned comment added by 207.98.239.187 (talk) 19:48, 7 September 2010 (UTC)

Styx does not perform this at its full length anymore because I believe there is some copyright issue with Dennis, and they also just don't want to. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 24.1.161.205 (talk) 21:58, 18 April 2011 (UTC)

I remember at both the Edge of the Century tour and the Return to Paradise tour there was a Roboto mask on stage near DeYoung's setup (and I believe it's visible in the concert video) but no songs from the record were played. I accepted the mask as a nod to the record while the omission as a nod to the tensions that broke the group up at that point. Lonadar (talk) 17:10, 24 March 2017 (UTC)

No Original Research[edit]

Let me be clear from the onset, I'm not a large fan of this band. I removed the claim regarding the purported "anti-Asian" material simply because it was unreferenced and to me had the clear earmarks of a violation of WP:OR cheers Deconstructhis (talk) 01:43, 1 August 2008 (UTC)

Solo hits[edit]

I changed the name of Dennis DeYoungs hit from the Karate Kid 2. The article originally said it was "Thia is the Time", but the hit song from Karate Kid 2 was "The Glory of Love". —Preceding unsigned comment added by Afailing (talkcontribs) 00:09, 11 July 2009 (UTC)

The above poster incorrectly named "The Glory of Love" as a Dennis DeYoung composition. It was in fact written by Peter Cetera (formerly of the band Chicago), and featured as the lead single from "The Karate Kid" soundtrack. The single DeYoung released from the soundtrack was called "This is the Time." —Preceding unsigned comment added by 69.151.212.88 (talk) 05:16, 15 July 2009 (UTC)

Styx I Robot[edit]

Happy Halloween. Record companies displacement. King Crimson 101. relate?75.201.119.66 (talk) 19:20, 26 October 2009 (UTC)

Removed loaded term from introduction[edit]

I replaced the phrase "known for meteorically popular hit songs" with "known for the popular hit songs" in the introduction. Not hating on Styx or anything, but it's a pretty loaded description, especially when none of the listed songs hit #1 on the charts. Plenty of more popular songs out there historically and a handful more at the time, so let's keep the terminology more neutral. James A. Stewart (talk) 05:04, 28 April 2010 (UTC)

So, are you saying that Babe was not a #1 hit? It most certainly was a hit and maybe the corrected statement was not so unaccurrate. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 24.1.161.205 (talk) 22:00, 18 April 2011 (UTC)

Arguing the accuracy of the adverb "meteorically"? Now that's just plain ridiculous. How successful Styx's songs were is irrelevant to the point, since "meteorically" is a very unencyclopedic term, and frankly just sounds silly in the statement in question.--Martin IIIa (talk) 20:37, 12 December 2011 (UTC)

List of best-selling music artists?[edit]

Why is this linked on the Styx page? Styx is not featured on the List of best-selling music artists page at all. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 98.240.84.196 (talk) 22:21, 17 June 2011 (UTC)

Dennis DeYoung and Styx in Mexico[edit]

Is that correct? Extra vocalist? Opening act, then headliner? Varlaam (talk) 20:22, 22 June 2011 (UTC)

Photo[edit]

Doesn't anyone have a photo of Styx? You know, that band from the 70s and 80s that sold millions of records, not the touring act from 30 years later? DFS (talk) 17:18, 2 August 2011 (UTC)

Rock of Ages Musical[edit]

Some Styx material features in the broadway musical 'Rock of Ages'. This is surely worth including? — Preceding unsigned comment added by Angstpristine (talkcontribs) 12:36, 1 February 2013 (UTC)

Formed in 1961 or 1972?[edit]

There seems to be some confusion between the infobox and personnel section as to when Styx officially "formed", with some reference to 1961 (as the year that the Panozzo's and DeYoung started working together) and 1972 (when the band officially became known as Styx.

In the interest of uniformity only one year should be considered for use on the page in the respective sections where such complications arise. Although there are arguments in favour of both cases, I would argue in favour of 1972, for two reasons:

1. Firstly, in 1972 a complete lineup of Styx existed, whereas in 1961 (and for several years after) only three of the 'founders' were involved in the band.

2. More importantly, if Styx formed in 1961, that would make Tom Nardini a member of Styx, and would mean his name should be featured in the infobox, as under Wikipedia's musical artist infobox guidelines (which can be found at Template:Infobox musical artist) it is stated that the 'past members section of the infobox should feature "...past members of the group, listed in order of joining with no other notation than names". It's been a while since I last visited this page but I'm pretty sure most editors are, rightly or wrongly, against Nardini's inclusion in the infobox (and the other respective sections for that matter).

Does anyone else have any thoughts on the matter?

Kind regards, 86.164.7.122 (talk) 20:07, 18 August 2014 (UTC)

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Cheers.—InternetArchiveBot (Report bug) 18:30, 6 December 2017 (UTC)